Offers, Promotions And Reviews

Lenovo

Amazon Discounts Header Logo

  • 1

  • 10 best 2-in-1 laptops 2015: top hybrid laptops reviewed Hybrid laptops, or 2-in-1s, are devices that are able to serve as both a laptop and a tablet, either in a detachable design that sees the touchscreen doubling as a tablet, or a convertible approach in which the notebook's hinge rotates 360 degrees for a similar effect. Hybrid laptops are generally priced in a range between £700 (about 450, AU£800) and £2,000 (around 1,169, AU£2,131). However, some manufacturers, like Acer 1 , make budget hybrids, and there are even 2-in-1s designed specifically for the business user, like the Dell Venue 7000 2 series. Now that Microsoft has released Windows 10 3 , expect an even greater selection 4 of these devices to pop up, like the Lenovo IdeaPad Miix 700 5 , which runs on the new operating system. With that, here are the best 2-in-1 laptops that we've reviewed: 1. Microsoft Surface Pro 3 CPU: 1.9GHz Intel Core i5-4300U (dual-core, 3MB cache, up to 2.9GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 4400 | RAM: 8GB LPDDR3 | Screen: 12-inch, 2160 x 1440 multi-touch (ClearType, 3:2 aspect ratio) | Storage: 256GB SSD | Optical drive: none | Connectivity: 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: Two 5MP webcams (1080p HD video) | Weight: 1.76 pounds Dimensions: 7.93 x 11.5 x 0.36 inches (W x D x H) Sharp display Perfect as laptop and tablet Mediocre battery life Runs hot at times This is not only Microsoft's most striking and versatile device to date, but the most convincing poster child for the hybrid category yet. And this ringing endorsement comes from a long-time skeptic of such devices. This version of the tablet comes in cheaper than the most affordable iPad Air and 13-inch MacBook Air combined, even with the Type Cover, and that's the point. On paper, this slate is more powerful than either Apple device, not to mention most other comparably priced laptops and tablets. The Surface Pro 3 might not be perfect, but it's far and wide the brightest shining example of a potential tablet takeover. If you're not concerned about a downgraded performance, consider the new Surface 3, which doesn't provide as much kick as the Pro, but is lighter and a lot cheaper. Read the full review: Microsoft Surface Pro 3 6 2. HP Spectre x360 CPU: 2.2GHz Intel Core i5-5200 (dual-core, 3MB cache, up to 2.7GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB DDR3 (1600Mhz) | Screen: 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 FHD Radiance LED-backlit touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11ac (2x2) and Bluetooth 4.0 combo | Camera: HP TrueVision Full HD WVA Webcam (front-facing) | Weight: 3.26 pounds | Dimensions: 12.79 x 8.6 x 0.63 inches (W x D x H) Superbly thin Vibrant, bright display Excellent performance and battery life Too heavy to use as a tablet Weird, wide trackpad Buy the HP Spectre x360. It easily comes as one of my most recommended machines, with an excellent 1080p screen, solid performance, good battery life, and sturdy build quality; all for an excellent deal at £999 ( 899, AU£1,899). If it weren't for a few missteps with the trackpad and being too hefty for tablet use, this laptop would have easily stood amongst the most highly rated laptops TechRadar has ever reviewed. Despite its flaws, though, the Spectre x360 is one of the best-looking and powerful devices HP has ever produced and well worth a look over many, many other 2-in-1 laptops. Read the full review: HP Spectre x360 7 3. Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 A versatile hybrid ideal for those who work as hard as they play CPU: Intel Core i5-5300U (2C, 2.30/2.90GHz, 3.0MB, 1600Mhz) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 1920x1080 | Storage: 180GB SSD OPAL2 | Optical drive: None | Connectivity: Intel Dual-Band Wireless AC 7265 + Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: HD 720p | Weight: 3.48 pounds (1.5kg) Dimensions: 12..44" x 8.70" x 0.74" (31 x 22 x 1.8 cm) Solid performance Versatile design Slightly heavy No ethernet port The Yoga 12 is a versatile bulldog of a device. You can use it as your work laptop. You can use it for play. It won't be the best pick for either of these tasks, but it won't stray too far from the upper tier either. At 3.4 pounds and 0.74 inches thick, it's just light and slim enough to claim portability. With more than seven hours of video playback, its battery is good enough to get through a workday, and it's affordably priced starting at just £845. Packing a full HD display that can bend into four different modes, you'll enjoy this device's flexibility, even though it isn't the lightest or sexiest device on the planet. With that being said, it performs on par or better than any of the devices on this list. If you need a larger screen, the Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 15 8 is also a great option. Read the full review: Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 9 4. Dell Inspiron 13 7000 An attractive, versatile package CPU: 2.4GHz Intel Core i7-5500 (dual-core, 4MB cache, up to 2.9GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB DDR3L (1,600MHz) | Screen: 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 FHD IPS touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11ac (2x2) and Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p front-facing webcam; built-in dual digital microphones | Weight: 3.68 pounds (1.67kg) | Dimensions: 12.99 x 8.74 x 0.75 inches (W x D x H; 330 x 222 x 19mm) Attractive design Sturdy construction Lackluster battery life A little hefty This notebook features excellent build quality and overall system performance. It's fast, it's slick, and it is ideal for students who need to bang out papers and general users who want a fast, compact notebook to tote around. Read the full review: Dell Inspiron 13 7000 10 5. Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro Lenovo's former-flagship Ultrabook is a real stunner CPU: 1.6GHz Core i5 4200U | Graphics: Intel HD 4400 | RAM: 4GB of DDR3 | Screen: 3,200 x 1,800 IPS multi-touch display | Storage: 128GB SSD | Optical drive: None | Connectivity: Intel Wireless-N 7260 Wi-Fi | Camera: 720P front-facing camera | Weight: 3.06 pounds Dimensions: 13 x 8.66 x 0.61 inches Unique flexible design Top-notch QHD IPS display No 802.11ac wireless adapter Keyboard complicates tablet mode With the Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro (starting at £1,099, 999, AU£1,599), we can now confirm that 3,200 x 1,800 pixels is delicious indeed. On top of the winning Yoga form factor, we loved the solid performance, backlit keyboard, and the snappy SSD, creating mobile device-like response times. At the £1,000 price point, you could put the Yoga 2 Pro in just about anyone's hands and make them quite pleased. For those of you who crave portability more than anything, Lenovo recently unveiled the new LaVie Z, which the company claims is the lightest convertible on the market. For those who want more power and don't mind a little heft, you could also check out the Lenovo Yoga 3 2014. Read the full review: Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro 11 6. Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11S The laptop that will bend over backwards for you CPU: 1.5 GHz Intel Core i7-3689Y | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 4000 (integrated) | RAM: 8GB PC3-12800 DDR3 SDRAM 1600 MHz SODIMM | Screen: 11.6" HD LED Multitouch 1366x768 | Storage: 128GB DDR SSD | Optical drive: none | Connectivity: Lenovo 802.11 b/g/n wireless, Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 1.0MP 720p HD integrated webcam | Weight: 3.10 lbs Dimensions: 11.73" x 8.03" x 0.67" Extremely portable Strong hinges USB 2.0 not 3.0 Tablet mode leaves keys exposed Yes, another Lenovo hybrid! The 11.6-inch Lenovo Yoga 11S (starting at around £799, 599, AU£1,299) laptop is a flexible machine that can fold over from a typical laptop stance to a stand position, to a position with the keyboard behind the screen, ready for delivering presentations. It comes with HDMI, SD card and USB ports, and boasts a surprisingly impressive Intel Core i7 processor, 8GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD for storage. The screen is sharp and bright, though not full HD, and works well with Windows 8. It's also nicely light and small for portability. You can easily use the Yoga 11S as you would any other laptop, replete with a full QWERTY keyboard. Read the full review: Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11S 12 7. Toshiba Satellite Click Mini Affordable and attractive CPU: 1.33GHz Intel Atom Z3735F with Burst Technology 2.0 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics | RAM: 2GB DDR3 SDRAM | Screen: 8.9-inch, 1920 x 1200 IPS LCD, 16:10 aspect ratio, 10 points multi-touch screen | Storage: 32GB eMMC Flash Memory | Connectivity: Wireless LAN 802.11b/g/n (up to 150 Mbps) | Camera: 5 MP Full HD rear camera with auto focus (back) and 2 MP Full HD web camera (front) | Weight: Tablet 1.04 pounds (472g); Tablet with keyboard 2.16 pounds (978g) | Dimensions: Tablet 9.25 x 0.385 x 6.34-inches (235 x 161 x 9.8mm) (W x D x H); Tablet with keyboard 9.25 x 6.72 x 0.78-inches (235 x 170.6 x 19.9mm) Full HD touchscreen Solid build quality Screen colours a little off Can't charge base separately Toshiba has created an incredible value full HD laptop that doubles as a tablet. It's perfect for frequent travelers, students taking notes in lectures, workers in meetings and people on a budget. This machine is well built and it runs smoothly and fast. Read the full review: Toshiba Satellite Click Mini 13 8. Asus Transformer Book T200 Another excellent transforming tablet-laptop from Asus CPU: 1.46GHz Intel Bay Trail-T Quad Core Z3775 | Graphics: Integrated Intel HD Graphics | RAM: 2 GB LPDDR3 | Screen: 11.-inch 16:9 IPS HD (1366 x 768) with multi-touch screen | Storage: 32GB eMMC With 500 GB HDD | Optical drive: None | Connectivity: Integrated 802.11 a/b/g/n, Bluetooth V4.0 | Camera: Front 2 Mp and rear 5 MP | Weight: 1.71 pounds Dimensions: 12 x 7.6 x 0.47 inches (W x D x H) Great value hybrid Good connectivity Low resolution screen Fairly bulky If you are looking for a combination of Windows laptop and tablet, the Asus Transformer Book T200 is a very appealing option that offers a fair amount for only £539 ( 349, or AU£690). The T200 is quiet, light, well built and feels responsive during normal usage. Battery life is excellent, so you won't find yourself hunting obsessively for charging points throughout the day. Its "smart" hard drive bay adds plenty of storage space alongside the speedy 32GB SSD, and despite having a disappointing resolution, the IPS display is at least vibrant with good viewing angles. Good connectivity in the form of USB 3.0 and RJ45 ports are welcome additions, with a reasonable pre-loaded software set finishing off the package nicely. Read the full review: Asus Transformer Book T200 14 9. Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 A powerful, small tablet that wants to play in the big leagues CPU: Intel Core M-5Y71 vPro | Graphics: Intel Gen7 graphics | RAM: 8 GB | Screen: 10.8-inch FHD 1920 X 1080 IPS display | Storage: 128 GB SSD | Optical drive: None | Connectivity: Intel 7265 dual-band 2X2 802.11 ac WiFi & Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 2-megapixel webcam; 8-megapixel rear camera | Weight: 1.6 pounds (0.72kg) Dimensions: 11.01 x 6.95 x .42 inches (27.97 X 17.65 X 1.07 cm) Performance Battery life Cramped screen Modest battery gains over i5 model At the £700 ( 437 and AU£800) entry price, the Venue Pro 7000 offers a nice balance of performance and portability in a travel-friendly size. However, unless you find yourself accessing CPU and GPU taxing apps, you might find more value in an Atom-based convertible. Going with Atom will lower your cost and give you better battery life. For those who need power and performance, the confines of a 10.8-inch display may be too rigid to maximize productivity. Opening more than a few tabs or windows on the small display will trigger claustrophobia. If you need to be more productive, there are bigger convertible options, like the Surface Pro 3, to choose from that may fit that need better. Or, if you prefer Android OS, and you don't mind a little less kick, you can go with the Dell Venue 10 7000 15 . Read the full review: Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 16 10. Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi This 2-in-1 laptop takes thinness to a new level CPU: 1.2GHz Intel Core M 5Y71 processor (dual-core, 4MB cache, up to 2.9GHz with turbo boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5300 | RAM: 8GB DDR3L (1600MHz) | Screen: 12.5-inch, 2,560 x 1,440 (WQHD) capacitive multi-touch IPS display | Storage: 128GB SSD | Optical drive: None | Connectivity: Intel Dual Band Wireless-N 7265 + Bluetooth 4.0 LE | Camera: 2MP 720p webcam | Weight: 3.14 pounds Dimensions: 12.5 x 7.5 x 0.65 inches (W x D x H) Vibrant display made for media Flexible use cases Colors a touch too saturated Unimpressive battery life The Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi is one of the first laptops to finally get the hybrid form factor right. Thanks to the use of a magnet latching system and Intel's fanless Core M processor, Asus has been able to produce a lighter tablet-laptop hybrid that's thin to boot. The detachable Bluetooth keyboard also opens up a few alternative ways to use the device. Over the last few weeks, I propped up the screen while I used the keyboard as a remote for Netflix and stood the screen on its side, using it as a makeshift vertical screen. The best thing about all this is it's entirely seamless, letting you easily switch between tablet and laptop modes with ease. Read the full review: Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi 17 Joe Osborne and Kevin Lee contributed to this article References ^ Acer (www.techradar.com) ^ Venue 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ Windows 10 (www.techradar.com) ^ greater selection (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo IdeaPad Miix 700 (www.techradar.com) ^ Microsoft Surface Pro 3 (www.techradar.com) ^ HP Spectre x360 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 15 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell Inspiron 13 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo Yoga 2 Pro (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 11S (www.techradar.com) ^ Toshiba Satellite Click Mini (www.techradar.com) ^ Asus Transformer Book T200 (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell Venue 10 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell Venue 11 Pro 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi (www.techradar.com)
  • 10 best 2-in-1 laptops 2016: top hybrid laptops reviewed Best 2-in-1 laptops Updated: The HP Spectre x360 15 has joined the ranks of our best 2-in-1 hybrid laptops 2-in-1s laptops, or hybrids, are devices that are able to serve as both a laptop and a tablet, either in a detachable design that sees the touchscreen doubling as a tablet, or a convertible approach in which the notebook's hinge rotates 360 degrees for a similar effect. Hybrid laptops are generally priced in a range between £700 (about 450, AU£800) and £2,000 (around 1,169, AU£2,131). However, some manufacturers, like Acer 1 , make budget hybrids, and there are even 2-in-1s designed specifically for the business user, like the Dell Venue 7000 2 series. Now that Microsoft has released Windows 10 3 , expect an even greater selection 4 of these devices to pop up, like the incredible Microsoft Surface Book 5 , and the stellar Microsoft Surface Pro 4 6 , the Dell XPS 12 7 and the first 4K resolution 2-in-1 the Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 8 . With that, here are the best 2-in-1 laptops that we've reviewed: 1. Lenovo Yoga 900 A thoughtfully refined 2-in-1 convertible CPU: 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-6500U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 520 | RAM: 16GB | Screen: 13.3-inch QHD+ 3,200 x 1,800 IPS display | Storage: 512GB SSD See all prices 9 Gorgeous display Slim design Shallow keyboard Display drivers issues Whereas the Lenovo Yoga Pro 3 had a winning design and underwhelming performance, the Yoga 900 is the full package. By integrating more powerful Intel Core I processors and a larger battery, Lenovo's latest flagship convertible can stand toe-to-toe with most Ultrabooks and even Microsoft's latest Surface Book. All this extra power has only made the Yoga 900 slightly thicker and heavier, however, it still largely retains a very thin and flexible frame that folds back into tablet mode. Read the full review: Lenovo Yoga 900 10 2. Microsoft Surface Book The ultimate Windows 10 hybrid laptop CPU: 2.4GHz Intel Core i5-6300U | Graphics: Intel HD graphics 520; Nvidia GeForce graphics | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.5-inch, 3,000 x 2,000 PixelSense Display | Storage: 256GB PCIe3.0 SSD See more Surface Book deals 11 Futuristic design Seamless tablet separation Battery life falls well below promises Major updates are still in tow Microsoft knocked it out of the park with its first ever laptop, the Surface Book. Though it has a peculiar 3:2 aspect ratio and 13.5-inch screen that's outside of the norm for most Ultrabooks, it's one of the best designed convertible laptops ever created. As a standalone tablet, otherwise known as the Clipboard, it's the most powerful and thinnest Windows 10 computers in the world, then docking it into the keyboard base affords it even more performance by way of its discrete GPU. Read the full review: Surface Book 12 3. HP Spectre x360 Sublime. Near-perfect. CPU: 2.2GHz Intel Core i5-5200 (dual-core, 3MB cache, up to 2.7GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB DDR3 (1600Mhz) | Screen: 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 FHD Radiance LED-backlit touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11ac (2x2) and Bluetooth 4.0 combo | Camera: HP TrueVision Full HD WVA Webcam (front-facing) | Weight: 3.26 pounds | Dimensions: 12.79 x 8.6 x 0.63 inches (W x D x H) See all prices 13 Superbly thin Vibrant, bright display Excellent performance and battery life Too heavy to use as a tablet Weird, wide trackpad Buy the HP Spectre x360. It easily comes as one of my most recommended machines, with an excellent 1080p screen, solid performance, good battery life, and sturdy build quality; all for an excellent deal at £999 ( 899, AU£1,899). If it weren't for a few missteps with the trackpad and being too hefty for tablet use, this laptop would have easily stood amongst the most highly rated laptops TechRadar has ever reviewed. Despite its flaws, though, the Spectre x360 is one of the best-looking and powerful devices HP has ever produced and well worth a look over many, many other 2-in-1 laptops. Read the full review: HP Spectre x360 14 4. Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 A stylish 4K convertible Ultrabook CPU: 2.5GHz Intel Core i7-6500U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 520 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 12.5-inch, 4K Ultra HD (3,840 x 2,160) TruBrite LED backlit touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: Intel Dual-Band Wireless-AC 7265; Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: HD webcam | Weight: 2.9 pounds | Dimensions: 11.8 x 8.2 x 0.61 inches See more Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 deals 15 Smart design and ergonomics Incredibly colorful screen Strange keyboard layout Dismal battery life Boasting one of the best looking 4K screens on the market, the Toshiba Radius 12 is a spectacular machine both inside and out. This sharp 2-in-1 laptop was designed to be held as a tablet just as much as it was meant to be used on your lap. Thanks to its lightweight and ergonomically designed chassis, this is one transformable notebook you'll actually want to hold in your hand. Read the full review: Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 16 5. HP Pavilion x2 The most affordable Windows 10 convertible CPU: 1.33GHz Intel Atom Z3736F | Graphics: Intel HD graphics | RAM: 2GB| Screen: 10.1-inch, 1,280 x 800 WXGA WLED IPS touchscreen display | Storage: 32GB eMMC | Connectivity: 802.11b WLAN and Bluetooth | Camera: HP TrueVision HD webcam | Weight: 2.61 pounds | Dimensions: 0.39 x 6.81 x 0.78 inches See more HP Pavilion x2 deals 17 Long battery life Absurdly affordable 32-bit Windows 10 Limited storage and memory Getting into the world of Windows 10 convertible's isn't cheap unless we're talking about the Pavilion x2. This 10-inch hybrid comes packing a surprising amount of goods considering its small size. It comes packed with a HD screen and more than enough power to get you through a simple day of web browsing and even image editing. When you're ready kick back with some streaming media, you can pop off the 10-inch works as a great little tablet. And if you're looking for something with a bit more screen real estate there's the 12-inch HP Pavilion x2. Read the full review: HP Pavilion x2 18 6. Dell Inspiron 13 7000 An attractive, versatile package CPU: 2.4GHz Intel Core i7-5500 (dual-core, 4MB cache, up to 2.9GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB DDR3L (1,600MHz) | Screen: 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 FHD IPS touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11ac (2x2) and Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p front-facing webcam; built-in dual digital microphones | Weight: 3.68 pounds (1.67kg) | Dimensions: 12.99 x 8.74 x 0.75 inches (W x D x H; 330 x 222 x 19mm) See more Dell Inspiron 13 7000 deals 19 Attractive design Sturdy construction Lackluster battery life A little hefty This notebook features excellent build quality and overall system performance. It's fast, it's slick, and it is ideal for students who need to bang out papers and general users who want a fast, compact notebook to tote around. Read the full review: Dell Inspiron 13 7000 20 7. Toshiba Satellite Radius 15 A sharp 4K laptop CPU: 2.4GHz Intel Core i7-5500U (dual-core, 4MB cache up to 3GHz with Turbo Boost) | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 12GB DDR3L (1600MHz) | Screen: 15.6-inch, 4K Ultra HD (3,840 x 2,160) TruBrite, LED backlit, IPS touchscreen | Storage: 512GB mSATA SSD | Connectivity: Intel Dual-Band Wireless-AC 7265, Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p HD webcam | Weight: 4.96 pounds | Dimensions: 14.9 x 9.6 x 0.79 inches (W x D x H) See more Toshiba Satellite Radius 15 deals 21 4K screen 12GB of RAM Heavy Short battery life Thanks to the combination of a great price and stacked hardware, the Radius 15 is one of the few successful UHD laptops. It joins a small pantheon of 4K laptops, with the Asus ZenBook Pro UX501 being its closest exemplar. In some ways, the Radius 15 is a better overall system with a more vibrant screen, a sharper design that's also thinner and smaller to boot. The Dell Inspiron 15 7000 is still one of the 15-inch best laptops we've ever reviewed and an incredible deal if you're on a budget. But if you're ready to make the resolution jump into 4K, you can't go wrong with the Toshiba Satellite Radius 15. Read the full review: Toshiba Satellite Radius 15 22 8. Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi Asus' thin and gorgeous 2-in-1 laptop CPU: 1.2GHz Intel Core M 5Y71 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5300 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 12.5-inch, 2,560 x 1,440 (WQHD) capacitive multi-touch IPS display | Storage: 128GB SSD | Connectivity: Intel Dual Band Wireless-N 7265 + Bluetooth 4.0 LE | Camera: 2MP 720p webcam | Weight: 3.14 pounds | Dimensions: 12.5 x 7.5 x 0.65 inches See more Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi deals 23 Flexible and versatile Thin and light design Micro-sized ports Unimpressive battery life If you're looking for a 2-in-1 machine that's much more portable, there aren't many devices that beat the Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi. This 12.5-inch convertible is among one of the thinnest in its class and taking the screen off the keyboard base turns the T300 Chi into a true Windows tablet. Though this device is powered by a low-wattage processor, it packs enough punch to drive a 4K display and get you through all your daily tasks. Sadly battery life is a little on the short side, but otherwise this is an excellent and affordable hybrid. Read the full review: Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi 24 9. HP Spectre x360 15 This 15-inch hybird is more portable than you think CPU: 2.3GHz Intel Core i5-6200U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 520 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 15.6-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 Full HD, WLED-backlit, IPS touchscreen | Storage: 256GB Flash SSD | Connectivity: Intel 802.11ac WLAN and Bluetooth | Camera: HP TrueVision Full HD webcam with dual digital microphones | Weight: 4.02 pounds | Dimensions: 14.8 x 9.75 x 0.63 inches Contrast-rich screen Long battery life for its size Poor ergonomics Weak speakers for their size The Spectre x360 15 is an excellent 2-in-1 laptop that stands out with its thin, all-metal body. It features an excellent 15-inch IPS touch panel and it only gets better if you add on the affordable 4K screen. The biggest characteristics that will help you get through a day is the Spectre x360 15's lightweight body and long battery life. Read the full review: HP Spectre x360 15 25 10. Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 A versatile hybrid ideal for those who work as hard as they play CPU: 2.3GHz Intel Core i5-5300U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 12.5" FHD (1,920x1,080) anti-glare multi-touch display | Storage: 128GB SSD | Connectivity: Intel Dual-Band Wireless AC 7265 + Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: HD webcam | Weight: 3.48 pounds | Dimensions: 12..44 x 8.70 x 0.74 inches See more Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 deals 26 Solid performance Versatile design Slightly heavy No ethernet port The Yoga 12 is a versatile bulldog of a device. You can use it as your work laptop and then you can flip it back into a tablet for play. It won't be the best pick for either of these tasks, but it still a solid solution anyway you spin it. At 3.4 pounds and 0.74 inches thick, it's just light and slim enough to be portable. With more than seven hours of video playback, battery life is long enough to get through a workday, and it's affordable price is just one of its most attractive aspects. Read the full review: Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 27 Juan Martinez and Joe Osborne has also contributed to this article References ^ Acer (www.techradar.com) ^ Venue 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ Windows 10 (www.techradar.com) ^ greater selection (www.techradar.com) ^ Microsoft Surface Book (www.techradar.com) ^ Microsoft Surface Pro 4 (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell XPS 12 (www.techradar.com) ^ Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 (www.techradar.com) ^ See all prices (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo Yoga 900 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Surface Book deals (www.techradar.com) ^ Surface Book (www.techradar.com) ^ See all prices (www.techradar.com) ^ HP Spectre x360 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 deals (www.techradar.com) ^ Toshiba Satellite Radius 12 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more HP Pavilion x2 deals (www.techradar.com) ^ HP Pavilion x2 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Dell Inspiron 13 7000 deals (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell Inspiron 13 7000 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Toshiba Satellite Radius 15 deals (www.techradar.com) ^ Toshiba Satellite Radius 15 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi deals (www.techradar.com) ^ Asus Transformer Book T300 Chi (www.techradar.com) ^ HP Spectre x360 15 (www.techradar.com) ^ See more Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 deals (www.in.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 12 (www.in.techradar.com)
  • 10 Best Back-to-School Laptop Backpacks Students carry a heavy burden. They need to move their books, their tech and their food from class to class. In many ways, it's their most important organizational tool. However, not all backpacks are equal. The best bags have water-resistant builds, adjustable straps, a ventilated back and plenty of compartments. But it can't be ignored that your backpack is as much a fashion statement as it is practical. It should reflect the tastes and interests of the student. Whether they are athletic, fashionable or intellectual, there is a bag that matches their personality and their needs. If you re looking for the best options on the market, we ve got your back. Case Logic Prevailer Backpack Basic black goes with everything, and this backpack holds almost anything. The dedicated laptop compartment of the Case Logic Prevalier holds a machine with up to a 17-inch display, plus there's a 10-inch tablet pocket. There's also space for water bottles, gym clothes, headphones, books and whatever else you need on campus. From £29.33 Amazon Hex Brigade Origin Backpack The fatigue woven cotton exterior of the Hex Brigade Origin Backpack is treated to be weather resistant. Dedicated pockets for a 10-inch tablet and a 15-inch laptop will protect against scratches and bumps. Plus, the large main compartment will hold all of your files and books, while the front zipper pocket is perfect for smaller gear and cables. From £79.95 Amazon High Sierra Tactic Backpack Add a little color to your student's life with the High Sierra Tactic Backpack -- and not break the bank. It's available in blue, black, brown, gray, green, and pink, and comes with patterned panels. It can also store your 17-inch laptop and tablet. Plus, there are tons of other compartments for books, cords and more. From £44.99 Amazon Eagle Creek XTA Backpack Perfect for the safety-conscious student, the Eagle Creek XTA Backpack features a sternum strap bucket with a built-in safety whistle. It also sports reflective accents and a loop for hooking a light. A dedicated pocket will keep your 16-inch laptop safe. Choose from black, blue or tan waterproof exteriors. From £99.00 Amazon Timbuk2 Sunset Backpack The Timbuk2 Sunset backpack sports a 1920s-esque, retro style, thanks to its top, snapping straps. An internal slip pocket holds a 13-inch laptop. The side pockets offer magnetic closures, for quick grab-and-go access. The main compartment, while not enormous, is just right for a few books and files you'll need for your trip to the quad or library. From £81.75 Amazon Hedgren Breeze Backpack Available in blue, yellow, red, green and brown, the Hedgren Breeze Backpack shows off your colorful side. The lined interior features pockets for both a 16-inch laptop and a 10-inch tablet. Plus, a side slip pocket offers easy access to smaller items. From £51.99 Amazon Thule EnRoute Triumph 2 Daypack The Thule EnRoute Triumph 2 is the way to go for those who want a backpack that can do double-duty as a school bag and as hiking equipment. The laptop compartment fits a 14-inch PC, as well as a tablet. Airflow channels on the back, padded shoulder straps and a sternum strap will make trekking easier. And don't forget your water bottle. From £89.95 Amazon Booq Daypack The sleek lines of the Booq Daypack exhibit true class. The main compartment is a cavernous space designed to carry all of the things you'll need on campus, including your gym clothes. The laptop sleeve fits a 15.6-inch laptop, and the two side pockets snap shut. The contoured shoulder straps make it easy to haul. From £71.85 Amazon Mobile Edge Razer Tactical Gaming Backpack Your gaming-obsessed academic will thank you for the Razer Tactical Gaming Backpack. It's built to safely carry a 17.3-inch laptop in a padded compartment, with a separate space for a tablet. It's made from the same ballistic nylon that is used to make flak jackets, and it s water-resistant. The Razer comes with a lifetime warranty. From £114.00 Amazon Kensington SecureTrek 15-inch The Kensington SecureTrek not only has dedicated pockets for a 15.6-inch laptop and a 10-inch tablet, but it also features a lock loop to make it easy to stop thieves from walking off with your stuff. It also includes anti-puncture zippers with locks that keep sticky fingers out. From £85.99 Amazon Recommended by Anna Attkisson, Laptop Mag & Tom's Guide Managing Editor A lover of lists and deadlines, Anna Attkisson covers apps, social networking, tablets, chromebooks and accessories. She loves each of her devices equally, including the phablet, three tablets, three laptops and desktop. She joined the Laptop Mag staff in 2007, after working at Time Inc. Content Solutions where she created custom publications for companies from American Express to National Parks Foundation. Anna Attkisson, Laptop Mag & Tom's Guide Managing Editor on
  • 10 Best Ultrabooks 2015: top thin and light laptops reviewed ... Ultrabooks have come a long way since they were first introduced to compete with the MacBook Air world. They're thin and light while featuring powerful Intel Core processors, fast SSD storage and superb battery life. But more than anything else they represent the bleeding edge of laptops; case in point the side shrinking Dell XPS 13 1 and the unbelievably light Lenovo LaVie Z 2 . Of course, this all means Ultrabook also come at a premium. Don't be surprised with prices that start at £999 (around 584, AU£1,064) just for the low-end and nearly £2,000 (around 1,169, AU£2,131) at the very high end. It's an arms race in the Ultrabook world and there's no room for losers in this space, as such it's hard not to find a great machine but below you'll find the very best cream of the crop. 1. Dell XPS 13 Possibly the best laptop on the planet, Dell's latest is a masterpiece CPU: 2.2GHz Intel Core i5-5200 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 3,200 x 1,800 | Storage: 230GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11 AC, Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p | Weight: 2.8 pounds Gorgeous display Super lightweight No ethernet port Off-centre webcam The new Dell XPS 13 is a 13.3-inch notebook, but it has the small footprint of an 11-inch machine. Fortunately for us, the XPS 13 isn't all beauty and no brains. This laptop features the horsepower to make work and play enjoyable, and it has just enough battery life to never leave you in a lurch. Regardless of whether you choose to upgrade to the touchscreen quad HD+ version, or if you stand pat with the full HD model, the Dell XPS 13 will provide you with a delightful experience for years to come. Read the full review: Dell XPS 13 3 2. Asus ZenBook UX305 A truly excellent ultrabook at a very agreeable price point CPU: 800MHz Intel Core M 5Y10 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5300 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch 1920x1080 | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: 802.11n + Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p | Weight: 2.6 pounds | Dimensions: 12.8 x 8.9 x 0.5 inches Very thin and light Incredible performance Wonky video driver Tinny speakers The ZenBook UX305 is a superbly-built, fully metal machine that's thin, light and very attractive. This lightweight system can easily take on any task whether its browsing the web, watching video or editing images. What's more, you get excellent battery life out of this machine all while doing. The most striking thing about the UX305 is that it comes at a £699 or 649 (about AU£902) price. While it isn't exactly a shining symbol of innovation in the Ultrabook space, it is the most affordable Ultrabook out today and it won't disappoint you. Read the full review: Asus ZenBook UX305 4 3. Asus ZenBook Pro UX501 An attractive alternative to a certain fruit-flavoured laptop CPU: 2.6GHz Intel Core i7-4720HQ | Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960M | RAM: 16GB | Screen: 15.6-inch, 3840 x 2160 IPS Display | Storage: 512GB PCIe x4 SSD | Connectivity: Intel PRO Wireless AC 7260 + BT Wireless LAN Combo | Camera: Built-in 720P Video Camera | Weight: 5.0 pounds | Dimensions: 15.08 x 10.04 x 0.84 inches Bright, vibrant screen Excellent performance Feels heavy Mediocre battery life If you're looking for a laptop with a little more meat on its bones but don't want to break the bank, the Asus ZenBook Pro UX501 is a stylish contender. It features a bright, vibrant 4K display and simply flies with the fastest storage drive around. While it's not the lightest Ultrabook around, it comes with a very capable processor and a dedicated graphics card to handle some light gaming too. The UX501's meaty innards and affordability make it an attractive option for content creators and media buffs alike. Read the full review: Asus ZenBook Pro UX501 5 4. Lenovo LaVie Z The lightest Ultrabook in the world CPU: 2.40GHz Intel Core i7-5500U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphic 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch WQHD (2560 x 1440) LED anti-glare | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: Wi-Fi 802.11 ac and Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: 720p HD | Weight: 1.87 pounds | Dimensions: 12.56 x 0.67 x 8.35 inches Core i7 processor Excellent WQHD screen Mediocre battery life Astronomical price tag By creating the 1.87-pound LaVie Z, Lenovo has created the lightest laptop in the world. Aside from its lightweight chassis, the Lavie Z offers performance and display are among the best available today. However, the laptop's somewhat questionable build quality, inferior battery life, and inflated price tag are qualities that could turn many off from what is an otherwise splendid device. Read the full review: Lenovo LaVie Z 6 5. HP EliteBook Folio 1020 G1 A thin, attractive business laptop posing as an Ultrabook CPU: 1.2GHz dual-core Intel Core M-5Y71 | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5300 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: value | Storage: 256GB M.2 SSD | Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.0; dual-band 802.11ac (B/G/N), dual-band Wi-Fi | Camera: 720p webcam | Weight: 2.68-pound | Dimensions: 12.2 x 8.27 x 0.62-inch Sleek design and tough construction Fingerprint scanner, enterprise security Underpowered Intel Core M performance No full-sized SD card reader Although it has the look and body of an Ultrabook, the HP EliteBook Folio 1020 G1 is very much a business laptop in disguise. Underneath its MacBook Air like exterior, this machine packs plenty of enterprise perks including fingerprint scanner, enterprise security and the durable build quality to meet a Military Specifications certification. At the same time though, the HP Folio 1020 G1 has a gorgeous design that's atypical of business-class notebooks. Cloaked in a unibody aluminum shell, the fanless Folio is one of the lighter, more attractive business portables in the world. Add in a gorgeous QHD screen, comfortably ergonomic keyboard, and this premium business machine is well worth its slightly premium price tag. Read the full review: HP EliteBook Folio 1020 G1 7 6. Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro A triumph for design, Lenovo's flagship is impressive if a little pricey CPU: Intel Core M | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 530 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13-inch 3200x1800 | Storage: 256GB SSD | Ports: 2 x USB 3.0 | Connectivity: 802.11ac | Camera: 720p | Weight: 2.62 pounds | Dimensions: 13 x 9 x 0.5 inches Slim and light Attractive hinge Quite pricey Poor battery life If you're all about style and don't need a super powerful machine, things don't get much better than Lenovo's latest flagship Ultrabook. While it may not be as punchy as its predecessor (thanks in part to its low-power, fanless Intel Core M chip), it can still manage all of the usual tasks you would throw at it. And given its new metallic hinge and super thin design, the Yoga 3 Pro makes a better case than ever for its multitudes of usage modes. At any rate, this is one of the thinnest, lightest and sharpest Windows laptops to date. And while you'll certainly pay for it, the price for such panache will be worth it for style nuts. Read the full review: Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro 8 7. Samsung Ativ Book 9 Plus With stunning performance and screen, it doesn't get much better than this CPU: 1.6 GHz Intel Core i5-4200U | Graphics: Intel integrated | RAM: 4GB | Screen: 13.3-inch 3,200 x 1,800 | Storage: 128GB SSD | Ports: 3 x USB 3.0 | Connectivity: 802.11ac | Camera: 720p | Weight: 3.06 pounds | Dimensions: 12.6 x 9 x 0.5 inches Incredible touchscreen Excellent battery It's expensive Full of bloatware Samsung was one of the very first PC manufacturers to jump on the Ultrabook bandwagon. It's done a fine job of representing Intel's baby ever since, with some stunning offerings. Now Samsung's Ativ Book 9 Plus (starting at £1,399, 1,412, AU£2,259) has kept the company ahead of the game for a while. It's a wonderful-looking unit that's thin and carefully crafted, with shiny, chamfered edges lining its all-aluminium chassis. But its plain black exterior might lend some clues as to its intent: This is premium-priced Ultrabook focused as much on the business user as the coffee shop regular. Read the full review: Samsung ATIV Book 9 Plus 9 8. Acer Aspire S7 Acer's luxurious laptop is an ultraportable star CPU: 2.4 GHz Intel Core i7-550U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.3-inch, 1,920 x 1,080 touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: value | Camera: value | Weight: value | 12.72 x 8.78 x 0.51 | Dimensions: 12.72 x 8.78 x 0.51 inches Attractive glass design Full-day battery life Screen limited to 1080p Too much bloatware If you have a passion for white electronics, the Aspire S7's looks alone may seal the deal, but the laptop is more than just a pretty face. Acer packs in Intel's Broadwell Core i7 processor, a battery that lasts close to a full work day, plenty of storage and RAM all into a sleek body. The Aspire S7 is an attractive and powerful laptop, but not one without compromises. If you're willing to invest a little time to removing bloatware and can live with a keyboard with the shallow key travel, then the Aspire S7 rewards you with a very capable computing experience that will also look good on your desk. Read the full review: Acer Aspire S7 10 9. Toshiba Kirabook A high-res Ultrabook that's easy on the eyes CPU: 2.4GHz Intel Core i7-5500U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 5500 | RAM: 8GB | Screen: 13.3 inch 2560 x 1440 WQHD touchscreen | Storage: 256GB SSD | Connectivity: Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7265 + Bluetooth 4.0 | Camera: HD webcam | Weight: 2.9 pounds | Dimensions: 12.4 x 8 x 0.37 inches Stylish design Good battery life Expensive Dim, bendy screen The Toshiba Kirabook (otherwise known as the Kira in the UK) sits at the higher end of the Ultrabook spectrum. It offers a high-res screen and a fully metal body that feels so premium, it even gives the MacBook 11 a run for its money. While there were a few missteps with the annoying keyboard and dim screen, you'll be pleased with this long lasting machine that's easy on the eyes. Read the full review: Toshiba Kirabook 12 10. Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon An excellent business laptop that (almost) has it all CPU: Intel Core i5-4300U | Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 4400 | RAM: 4GB | Screen: 14-inch, 2560 x 1440 IPS | Storage: 180GB SSD | Ports: 2x USB 3.0 | Connectivity: 802.11ac | Camera: 720p | Weight: 3.15 pounds | Dimensions: 13.03 x 8.94 x 0.73 inches Clever adaptive keyboard Fantastic design Generally dim screen Average battery life The Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon (starting at £1,186, 1,198, AU£1,699) is a business laptop that straddles the line between form and function more than ever after this update. For those with a penchant for aesthetics, here's a brand new design with some fantastic new features. And to keep the no-nonsense business user happy, this is a plenty powerful piece of hardware. The connectivity on offer through this Ultrabook's super slim design profile alone is impressive. And the adaptive keys, while divisive, add a ton of function in a limited amount of space and an attractive presentation. Look out, MacBook Pro, you're no longer the only thin and light business option on the block. Read the full review: Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 13 References ^ Dell XPS 13 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo LaVie Z (www.techradar.com) ^ Dell XPS 13 (www.techradar.com) ^ Asus ZenBook UX305 (www.techradar.com) ^ Asus ZenBook Pro UX501 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo LaVie Z (www.techradar.com) ^ HP EliteBook Folio 1020 G1 (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro (www.techradar.com) ^ Samsung ATIV Book 9 Plus (www.techradar.com) ^ Acer Aspire S7 (www.techradar.com) ^ MacBook (www.techradar.com) ^ Toshiba Kirabook (www.techradar.com) ^ Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon (www.techradar.com)
  • 10 Reasons Why Consumers Should Buy Business Laptops Laptop makers take great pains to differentiate between their consumer- and professional-oriented product lines. But in many cases, home users would be better off if they ignored the marketing spin and bought business laptops. While consumer portables are usually designed for style, business laptops frequently offer a tougher chassis, more configuration options and better usability. Large corporate customers buy these notebooks by the thousands and expect them to last for several years. So if manufacturers want to keep Fortune 500 clients happy, they need to design their business laptops to a higher standard of quality. Even if you don't "work" in the traditional sense all you do on your laptop is write emails, surf the Web and post to social media you can benefit a great deal from a notebook that's optimized for productivity but is still affordable. Here are 10 reasons to consider a business laptop. Built to Last If you want a notebook that can survive drops and spills, a business system is more likely to take the abuse. Lenovo, for example, equips a number of its ThinkPads, including the T450s, with a roll cage that helps it survive. Matte Displays with Better Viewing Angles Glossy displays have become nearly ubiquitous on consumer notebooks, because vendors believe consumers shopping retail will be swayed by their shininess and slightly more vibrant colors. However, the glossier the display, the worse the viewing angles. (Imagine trying to read a Web page and seeing your reflection more than the text.) If they don't come with touch screens, most business systems have matte displays. For example, in Dell's lineup, the consumer-oriented Dell Inspiron 15 5000 1 comes with a glossy panel, while the Dell Latitude 15 5000, which is marketed to corporate customers, comes standard with an anti-glare display. Unfortunately, if you configure the Latitude, or any other business laptop, with a touch screen you will have to live with a glossy surface because that's necessary for touch. MORE: Best Business Laptops 2 Better Keyboards We're not saying that consumer keyboards and touchpads aren't good, just that their business counterparts have to bring something really tactile and responsive to the table to appeal to enterprises, which are always focused on productivity (aka typing). For example, Lenovo's ThinkPad keyboards are the gold standard for all laptops, with snappy feedback, strong travel and large, curved keys that are easy to feel without looking. However, the same company's consumer laptops often suffer from weak travel and shrunken keys. For example, the £949 Yoga 3 14 has shallow, dull keys, whereas the enterprise-friendly ThinkPad Yoga 14 3 , which goes for £959, has 60 percent more vertical travel and 10 percent more actuation force, giving it a much better typing experience. More and Better Pointing Options We can't name a single consumer notebook with anything other than a touchpad for navigation. However, if you like pointing sticks (and we do), several business systems have them in addition to touchpads. Everyone knows that Lenovo ThinkPads have their famous red TrackPoints, but several HP ProBooks, Dell Latitudes and Toshiba Tecras also have pointing sticks between their G and H keys. Many people love these so-called "nubs" because they're more accurate than touchpads and because touch typists don't have to lift their fingers off the home row to use them. The touchpads on business laptops are usually designed for form over function. In many cases, they have discrete buttons, whereas most consumer models force you to click left or right on the entire pad, which is less accurate and less comfortable. Replaceable, Extended Batteries These days most laptops come with sealed-in batteries that you can't remove without taking them to a service center. However, some business systems still let you swap batteries on your own so you can carry a spare or upgrade to a larger unit. For example, you can buy the Latitude 14 5000 with either a 3-cell or a 4-cell battery, with the latter costing just £20.35 more. Less Crapware A large or mid-size business simply can't afford to pay its IT department to sit there uninstalling crapware from each new notebook it orders. Vendors know this and intentionally avoid overloading their business notebooks with too much unwanted trialware. You still find trial versions of security software, but that's usually about it. Biometric Security You won't see too many consumer laptops with fingerprint readers, but many business systems have them standard or as an inexpensive (£20 to £30) option. With a reader, you can swipe-login to Windows or configure a password manager to use your fingerprint as a credential. Long Life Span, More Serviceable Because corporations hold onto their laptops for years, hardware vendors must keep offering parts and service. For that reason, business models usually stay on the market for a year or longer and components, such as replacement batteries and AC Adapters, are available for many years. Although a lot of ultrathin business notebooks are difficult, if not impossible to service on your own, mainstream and larger sizes usually have RAM and storage that you can upgrade. Reasonably Priced Now you might be asking: What about price? Depending on what you compare it with, a business system may cost £100 to £200 more than a consumer model for the same specs. Other times, the price delta is minimal. For example, the consumer-oriented Toshiba Satellite Radius P55W costs just £70 less than a similarly configured Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga 15, which is marketed as a business system but provides a much better keyboard, discrete graphics and 3 hours of additional battery life. Bottom Line Many of the major notebook vendors have built their organizations around the idea that businesses and home users have different needs and deserve different products. However, there's no reason to buy into that marketing hype. If you want a laptop as opposed to a tablet or a phone, it's because you have work to do, whether that work is programming a website, composing a newsletter for the PTA, authoring a book report for your third-grade class or keeping up with relatives on Facebook. Many times, a business notebook makes that work a lot easier. Recommended by Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director The official Geeks Geek, as his weekly column is titled, Avram Piltch has guided the editorial and production of Laptopmag.com since 2007. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram programmed several of LAPTOP's real-world benchmarks, including the LAPTOP Battery Test. He holds a master s degree in English from NYU. Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director on References ^ Dell Inspiron 15 5000 (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best Business Laptops (www.laptopmag.com) ^ ThinkPad Yoga 14 (www.laptopmag.com)
  • 10 Tablets with the Longest Battery Life 15 hours: That's the kind of all-day battery life people have been dreaming of since forever. Lenovo's Yoga Tab 3 has it, and as such, might be the best mobile media tablet on the market. Its 8-inch screen is relatively bright, and Lenovo's tablet even comes with a built-in kickstand. The extra-large battery results in a bigger-than-normal design, and the Snapdragon 212 processor can feel a little lethargic at times, but if you're all about watching movies and surfing the Web, the Yoga Tab 3 can go all day.
  • 10 Things You Need to Know: The Apple iPad Pro 9.7-Inch For once, the rumors were uncannily accurate: As we wrote this on March 21, Apple released smaller crab-apple versions of two of its signature mobile products, the iPhone and the iPad Pro. (For our introduction to the Apple iPhone SE, check out our accompanying 10 Things You Need to Know: Apple iPhone SE 1 .) The rumored iPad Air 3 didn't actually emerge, but for the new small stuff, it was still a big news day. The developments surrounding the iPad tablets were technically three-fold: (1) a new, smaller-screened version of the jumbo, pen-enabled Apple 2 iPad Pro 3 tablet; (2) a new, lower entry price £399 on the mainstay model of the iPad line, the Apple iPad Air 2 4 ; and (3) a new top-end capacity for the already released full-size (12.9-inch-screened) iPad Pro. Let's break down the Apple iPad Pro announcement here. 1. The name's the same; the screen is smaller. The new-for-2016 iPad Pro has a 9.7-inch screen, down from the 12.9-inch whopper in the original iPad Pro. In a move to establish a new, discrete multi-member family within the iPad hierarchy, the name is not changing, though. It's still just "iPad Pro," differentiated only by the screen size. (No "iPad Pro Mini" here.) The Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch atop the 12.9-inch version. If you've held an iPad Air or Air 2, you've pretty much held the new iPad Pro. The overall dimensions of the iPad Pro are 0.24 inch thick, with a 9.4x6.6-inch footprint. It weighs exactly the same amount as the Apple iPad Air 2 (0.96 pound, or about 15.3 ounces), with a few feathers of variance depending on whether you're looking at the Wi-Fi-only or the Wi-Fi-plus-cellular version of each. 2. The capacity standards have shifted. As we mentioned above, with the release of the 9.7-inch Apple iPad Pro, Apple also upped the maximum capacity on the original 12.9-inch iPad Pro. It's now 256GB. (Previously, the big 'Pad Pro topped out at 128GB.) With Apple's iPads lacking the ability to accept an expansion card, the storage capacity at which you buy these tablets matters more than with most tablets. What you buy is what you're stuck with, unless you upload your media or other files to the cloud. Keeping things parallel between the Pros, the new 9.7-inch iPad Pro is debuting at the same capacity increments that the bigger Pro now sells at: 32GB, 128GB, and 256GB. The traditional 16GB and 64GB options have been resigned to history, at least for now. The 256GB capacities of both of these tablets are both on the high-priced side (which we'll get to in a moment), but the move to these capacities makes sense. With the addition of the ability to shoot and edit video in 4K resolution directly on the new iPad Pros, those smaller capacities of yesteryear are liable to fill up fast with giant movie files. 3. Pricing moves, up and down the line. The introduction of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro coincided with a price drop on Apple's mainstay 9.7-inch iPad, the iPad Air 2. That tablet now starts at £399 in its 32GB version, the same price that until the March 21 announcement the original iPad Air 5 was still selling for from Apple. Presumably, the iPad Air (the non-"2" version) will be going away; it had been removed from the Apple Store's iPad pages at the time of the 9.7-inch Pro launch. The 32GB iPad Pro 9.7-inch starts at £599, the 128GB model at £749, and the new 256GB capacity at £899. (Adding cellular support, as we'll get to later, adds to the price of each.) That pricing creates a lot of dollar daylight between the 9.7-inch Apple iPad Pro and the 9.7-inch Apple iPad Air 2 a big £200 difference in starting prices especially considering that one of the iPad Pro's main attractions, the Apple Pencil stylus 6 , is still not included in the box with the Pro models, but remains a £99 add-on. The Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch with Apple Pencil. 4. We see tweaks to the screen... The screen on the new, smaller iPad Pro may be the same size as that in the iPad Air 2, with the same native "Retina" resolution of 2,048x1,536 pixels. But Apple is putting a bunch of claims out there comparing the two, all in favor of the Pro's screen. (Gotta justify that price premium somehow , right?) The company claims that the new 9.7-inch screen features the "lowest reflectivity of any tablet," with a 25 percent maximum brightness improvement over the iPad Air 2 screen, as well as a 40 percent reduction in reflectivity. Another claimed improvement is in the color gamut and saturation. The percentage claim in the latter case is a 25 percent improvement in saturation levels, as well as a new bank of light sensors that read incoming light levels and adjust the color levels to look their best under the current ambient lighting where the tablet is. We could see this being a feature to disable for applications in which precision color-matching is critical, but it's an interesting development for casual use, image viewing, and the like. We'll report when we get our hands on the tablet, hopefully in the coming weeks. 5. ...including something called "Night Shift." It's increasingly common these days for makers of computer and mobile display devices to pay some marketing attention to the ostensible problem of blue-light emissions. Some users report difficulty in sleeping when exposed excessively to the glow of backlit device screens in the hours before bed, due to the disruption of the body's circadian rhythms, and research has shown a variety of deleterious medical effects; Harvard Health has a good rundown of the blue-light basics here 7 . The ability to filter out some portion of the blue wavelengths has emerged as a feature in certain laptop screens and tablets, and Apple is working that into the iOS 9.3 software update that will accompany these new devices. Night Shift is the result. It uses geolocation to determine the local time for the tablet where it is and auto-adjusts the screen's light profile to reduce the blues when the time is right. This will work with other devices that get the iOS 9.3 upgrade as well. 6. Smaller size, but still quad-audio. We liked the immersive character of the sound input of the iPad Pro 12.9-incher insofar as open-to-air audio can be "immersive," in a tablet. We're surprised, though, that Apple retained the four-speaker array of the 12.9-inch tablet in the 9.7-inch version, especially considering that the 9.7-inch iPad Air 2 is limited to a twin set. The speakers are positioned one at each corner, and while we suspect you'll still get the best results in open-air sound when the tablet is parked up against a hard surface or lying flat, in both cases to reflect the sound back at you (the speakers don't fire forward, alas), the ones in the 12.9-inch tablet were still a marked improvement over those in the iPad Air 2. Also, in an interesting (literal) twist, the iPad Pro auto-adjusts the speaker output according to the tablet's orientation. High frequencies get emphasized in the uppermost two speakers, regardless of whether the tablet is rotated horizontally or vertically. This matters because, in most cases, you'd watch video in landscape mode on this tablet, but many gaming apps are designed for portrait-orientation play. The audio circuitry can compensate for both. 7. The built-in cams get a boost. It's tough to do much more with the cameras in a skinny tablet without making some kind of fundamental hardware change to accommodate the lens. The 8-megapixel shooter in the 12.9-inch iPad Pro got a boost and a bump (literally!) in the 9.7-incher, though. Now, it's a 12-megapixel cam (the rear one that Apple typically calls "iSight") sticking out the back of the chassis. We do indeed mean sticking out . It's not very big, but a ring around the lens protrudes from the upper corner of the iPad Pro 9.7-inch, where previous iPad cams were typically flush. Still, there is some payoff beyond the simpel megapixel boost. The cam and its extra prominence now support up to 63-megapixel panorama shots and the whole panoply of Apple photography jiggery-pokery: Live Photos (which are still pics that move briefly when touched, a bit like a short Vine video), 4K audio capture, and 240fps slow-motion video recording. We also appreciated a clever development with the front FaceTime HD camera, in the form of the Retina Flash feature. This makes use of the screen itself as a source of extra "flash-bulb"-style light when you're taking selfies. It flashes to fill in the shot when you're shooting your own mug in a dim environment. 8. Color schemes: Rose joins the pack. The rear-panel colors on the iPad Pro 9.7-inch comprise the usual suspects: silver, gold, and Apple's Space Grey. A new addition here, though, is a rose-gold hue from the iPhone side of the aisle. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro is the only one of the iPads to feature the rose-gold option. All of the other current-gen iPads come in just silver, Space Grey, and gold, with the exception of the iPad Mini 2, which is limited to just the silver and grey. The four colors of the new, smaller iPad Pro. 9. The connectivity gets kicked up. At least, that's the case with the cellular versions of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro. Apple dubs these the "Wi-Fi + Cellular" models, and they cost the usual £130 kick-up at any given storage capacity, in parallel with Apple's other iPads. The cellular-capable iPad Pro, like the cell versions of the iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 4, includes the Apple SIM, which is a flexible-plan SIM card that works with multiple carriers (at this writing, AT&T, T-Mobile, and Sprint). Humble Wi-Fi is still leading-edge stuff here, in the form of 802.11ac. The 9.7-inch iPad Pro also adds support for LTE Advanced, an enhanced-speed service available under certain plans with specific wireless carriers. LTE support for these devices is region-dependent, as well; see this Apple LTE support guide 8 for details on LTE bands, and regional carriers, specific to the iPads. 10. Same accessories, but different sizes. The big add-on for the Apple iPad Pro of either size is the Apple Pencil, which remains a £99 option but is the main reason that many users would opt for the iPad Pro over the iPad Air 2 in the first place. You'll want to factor it into your shopping considerations with any iPad Pro. The Pencil was fairly big relative to the size of the 12.9-inch iPad Pro, so it's positively huge compared to the 9.7-inch version. The other major Apple accessory for the new Pro is scaled to size, though. That's the add-on Smart Keyboard, which now comes in versions right-sized for the 9.7-inch and 12.9-inch tablet models. The reduction in size means just a modest drop in price, though. The 12.9-inch-compatible Smart Keyboard was and remains £169 (a bit high, we thought, at its debut), while the new 9.7-inch iPad Pro's version of the Smart Keyboard is £149. Apple's Smart Keyboard accessory attached to the iPad Pro 9.7-inch. Apple has also augmented its Silicone Case and Smart Cover lines to fit the new 9.7-inch Pro. Each is £10 less than its 12.9-inch iPad Pro counterpart: £69 and £49 respectively. Each will come in a choice of a dozen colors. Smart Cover for the Apple iPad Pro 9.7-inch. The iPad Pro 9.7-inch begins pre-orders on March 24 and is expected to ship, according to Apple, starting on March 31. Stay tuned for a full review of this new iPad Pro when we get our mitts on one. References ^ 10 Things You Need to Know: Apple iPhone SE (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple (www.computershopper.com) ^ iPad Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple iPad Air 2 (www.computershopper.com) ^ the original iPad Air (www.computershopper.com) ^ the Apple Pencil stylus (www.pcmag.com) ^ Harvard Health has a good rundown of the blue-light basics here (www.health.harvard.edu) ^ see this Apple LTE support guide (www.apple.com)
  • 11.6" LAPTOP LED SCREEN WXGA HD FOR IBM-Lenovo THINKPAD X140E 20BM0009US FOR SALE - Reduced
  • 12″ Apple MacBook Review: Great Laptop Priced Wrong Posted on December 24, 2015 Apple pulled out every bit of magical marketing it could during the announcement of the 12-inch MacBook. The elaborate and beautifully produced videos are like a crack addiction with Jony Ive s British accent luring you in. The new MacBook was touted to be revolutionary no surprise there and groundbreaking. But did Apple hit the mark with the new MacBook, let s find out in our 12 Apple MacBook review. Specifications Design Whether you re a fan of Apple or not, its design is usually one of the best things about buying an Apple product and the 12 MacBook doesn t disappoint. It s super thin and super light, coming in at 2.03lbs, which is amazing and easy to carry around all day. Honestly, the machine feels and looks like an iPad Air 2 with a keyboard cover on it. Speaking of keyboard, the new keyboard design is nice. It will take time to get used to the new, shallower butterfly keys and you may or may not like them. The trackpad design is awesome, as are all MacBook trackpads. This one has the added benefit of Force Touch and that makes it even nicer to use. Two ports, this is all you get with the MacBook. One headphone jack and one USB-C port. This limits the amount of peripherals you can use with this machine to basically almost none. Unless you get dongles and extensions, you re looking at very limited interface options. I also have to say that I miss the mag-safe connector. I have five kids and the mag-safe connector has saved my MacBook Pro Retina more than a few times. With the new connector, you ll have to be more vigilant where you plug-in. Overall, the design, look and feel of the 12 MacBook is one of its strongest selling points and Apple really did an amazing job on this one. Display The MacBook sports a 12 LED IPS display with a 2304-by-1440 resolution and 226PPI and it is the second selling point of this laptop. The display is absolutely mind-blowingly beautiful and working and looking at this display is a great experience. Colors are spot on, not oversaturated but balanced. Blacks and whites are great and watching video on this machine is a joy. Overall the display is a home run, Apple did another great job at making a crisp, balanced and functional display. Software / Ecosystem OS X El Capitan has proven to be a nice improvement over OS X Yosemite. Even on my 15 MacBook Pro Retina it seemingly runs much faster and smoother. If you live in the Apple ecosystem everything will just fall into place nice and smooth. I guess the best way to say this is. Those who hate Apple will hate OS X, simply because they hate Apple. Those who currently use OS X will be happy. Those who ve never used OS X should know that it is very worthwhile considering it as your operating system. Performance The 12 MacBook is running a dual-core Intel Core M processor, which you can configure from 1.1GHz to 1.3GHz. The base MacBook comes with the 1.1GHz and it does a great job at running the basics and then some. Before I go on, let s be clear, this MacBook is not going to be a power user machine. That being said, the 1.1GHz Intel M processor is surprisingly great. You also get two storage options, 256GB or 512GB. My reasons for buying the MacBook were two fold; I wanted something light and easy to carry during CES 2016 and I wanted OS X. Some of the other stuff I need it for is photo and video editing. Before I purchased the MacBook I researched heavily. In my research, I found most of the it pointed at this machine being able to handle light photo and video editing and that is indeed true. I m not running Photoshop on the MacBook, instead I opted for Affinity as it s lighter and it runs great on the MacBook. Word of warning though, as I said before, this is not a power user machine so heavy photo editing is probably going to bog it down. Still, I was able to comfortably have a dozen files open in Affinity and the MacBook never flinched. Running Final Cut Pro also works and rendering 1080p video works pretty well, I wouldn t even attempt 4K video editing here. I would also stay away from heavy video editing, this is a portable and take-on-the-run laptop, the Intel M is not going to handle huge files very well. Overall though, the Intel M in the MacBook does surprisingly well. I m able to run photo and video editing software to do basic, small editing projects. Everything else a computer should do works just fine on the MacBook. Email, browsing, social media etc etc, you ll have no issues running day to day Internet and word processing type tasks. Speakers / Sound In two words holy crap! I wasn t expecting great sound from this little machine but the MacBook delivers. Watching movies on this with those speakers is a very enjoyable experience. Camera In two words total crap! On the reverse side of the speakers I was expecting the FaceTime camera to at least be a 720p (at minimum) shooter. Instead, Apple went to the dumpsters and retrieved their old stock of 2007 white MacBook iSight cameras. Battery Life Apple advertises around nine hours of battery life using the web only. I was able to get around 7-8 hours with my regular use which includes photo editing with Affinity Photo. The battery life is pretty decent and USB-C charges the MacBook fairly fast. Price / Value In two words seriously overpriced! For all the great things the 12 MacBook brings to the table it s price tag is the single biggest reasons NOT to buy this machine. Starting at £1,299 and heading close to the £1,800 territory specced out, Apple really got greedy with this laptop. While there s a lot to love about this laptop, I don t think it s enough to justify that crazy price. You can get a better specced MacBook Air for £999, minus the Retina display, which will run heavier apps and be more of a power machine. The only thing that pushed me to purchase the MacBook was my need for a light laptop for CES 2016 and not wanting to leave the OS X ecosystem to do it. Walking around CES with a full size laptop in a backpack along with other gear for 6-7 days is tiring and that is the only reason I pulled the trigger. Apple got my money but for the price, I wanted more. This would have been a better value priced at £899. Wrap Up A powerful and portable laptop with an amazing screen, great build quality, good battery life and OS X. But Apple priced this way too high. Only buy this if you really are curious, otherwise, buy a MacBook Air or a Windows equivalent. 12 Bottom Line A powerful and portable laptop with an amazing screen, great build quality, good battery life and OS X. But Apple priced this way too high, only buy this if you really are curious, otherwise, buy a MacBook Air or a Windows equivalent. *We reviewed a retail unit of the MacBook purchased by the reviewer.
  • 13 Ways to Make a Slow Laptop Faster Your laptop may be slow, but that doesn't mean you need to replace it. Through heavy use, your notebook will collect a ton of excess files and programs, not to mention some literal dust. The parts will age, and software updates will become more demanding. But before you go computer shopping, there are a few hardware and software fixes you should try. A little time, a screwdriver and a few settings changes can have your laptop running as though it were new. Here are 13 ways to speed up your system. Add an SSD Adding a solid-state drive (SSD) is the single biggest hardware change you can make to speed up a laptop. It makes everything faster; booting up, shutting down and launching apps will all occur in the blink of any eye when compared to traditional hard drives. More and more laptops are coming with built-in SSDs, but not all of them do. And if your old laptop has a traditional hard drive inside, you can crack it open for a significant speed boost at a reasonable price. A 256GB SSD, which is a decent capacity for most users, can cost as little as £75. Upgrade Your RAM You should have at least 8GB of RAM. These days, your best bet is to buy your laptop with that much memory, as more and more manufacturers are soldering it to the motherboard, making it impossible to add more. A number of laptops still let you open them up, and RAM is relatively cheap. If you have 4GB, upgrade to 8GB, as the additional memory will probably cost you less than £25. Few people need 16GB of RAM right now. Update Your Startup Programs Anything running in the background will slow your computer's boot-up time and devote resources to programs you may not even be using. Luckily, it's simple to turn these off. In Windows 10, go to Task Manager > Startup to see the list of programs you have running when you turn on your computer. On a MacBook, go to System Preferences > Users & Groups > Login Items to adjust which programs launch when you turn on the computer. Uninstall Unused Apps Unused programs take up storage on your hard drive and can suck resources from the CPU. Delete the junk to free up space and processing power for a faster computer. Be sure to check your library files for any junk that may stick around. Run Regular Malware Scans It's possible that something you didn't install intentionally malicious software could be the reason your laptop is slow. Run regular virus and malware scans 1 to prevent something malicious from slowing down your laptop or worse. Being vigilant can help you avoid and eliminate threats that are hoarding resources or filling your laptop with junk files. Kill Animations The animations in your OS look cool, but they take up resources that could be going elsewhere. In Windows: 1. Search for "View advanced system settings." 2. Choose Settings under Performance. 3. Choose "Adjust for best performance," which will turn off a bunch of special effects and animations. In OS X: 1. Go to System Preferences > Dock. 2. Check the boxes to turn off magnification and stop the animations in opening applications. Speed Up Your Shutdowns When you go to shut down Windows, you often have to wait a long time while the computer attempts to close open programs that won't close gracefully on their own. If you're willing to dig into your registry, you can force the shutdown process to kill these rebel apps right away. Be sure you always save your work when you do this, as it will close open programs without prejudice. Disable Web Results In Windows 10, Cortana searches the web and your local files when you search. This takes time to download and can be a drag on your system. If you use the Cortana box primarily to find files and apps that live on your hard drive, Windows 10 makes it easy to turn off web results. Speed Up Your Downloads Folder The File Explorer, one of the most-used folders in Windows, can take forever to load if it's chock-full of your downloads. If you're seeing a loading bar every time you open the folder, you'll want to optimize it. Keep It Clean Don't let your laptop get too dusty, or you'll risk letting it overheat. When that happens, the processor and graphics card have to work harder to perform well. Get a can of compressed air 2 , and clean out the vents to give your processor and graphics card a breather. Change Your Browser Some browsers are faster than others. If you're a heavy user, Chrome can eventually hog your RAM, especially with a whole bunch of tabs open. Microsoft's Edge isn't as full-featured yet, but it has the benefit of being lighter and faster. On Macs, you can try Safari. Update Your Drivers Some new drivers can breathe new life into your hardware and fix any issues it may be having. Be sure to check your manufacturer's website to make sure your drivers are up-to-date. Top Image: Bastian Weltjen / Shutterstock 3 Laptop Guide Laptop Guide Recommended by Andrew E. Freedman, Andrew joined Laptopmag.com in 2015, reviewing computers and keeping up with the latest news. He holds a M.S. in Journalism (Digital Media) from Columbia University. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Kotaku, PCMag and Complex, among others. Follow him on Twitter @FreedmanAE. Andrew E. Freedman, on References ^ regular virus and malware scans (www.tomsguide.com) ^ can of compressed air (www.amazon.com) ^ Bastian Weltjen / Shutterstock (www.shutterstock.com)
  • 14.4″ Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying^ Review Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook | Notebook Review Corners You are here: Home 1 / Uncategorized 2 / ^ Review Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook Searching for best price Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook , you have the right to be here because today we will review about this product Feature. . . these product is very good for you, because product are designed to provide great quality . Hi guys.. good tips for you. Firstly, before you make a deal, You can see the best Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook reviews from its Features and its description. To know more about it, please See full reviews and latest price from link below what s feature and Full detail of Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook 100% brand new and high quality sleeve case with zipper closure, this sleeve can be use as mouse pad also Made of Super soft NEOPRENE, Light-weight Durable material,protect your laptop from scratching, Shock and dust Double zipper design, more convenient to use,Smart-design:Handle inside case be use as sleeve or Hand bag Waterproof breathable, soft and flexible feel good,Can be repeated cleaning, easy to dry. Never Fade Dimension: about 360 mm(14.2 inch) x 280 mm (11 inch); Compatible with :all 14 / 14.1 / 14.4 Laptop Products spec 3 Comments are closed for ^ Review Waterfly Fashion Noble Luxury 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Notebook Computer Tablet PC Sleeve Carrying Bag Case Pouch Protetor Cover Holder for Dell 6430u 14 HP G42 14 Lenovo G40 14 And Most 14 14.1 14.4 Inch Laptop Ultrabook Chromebook Laptop Notebook Disclaimer : Site is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com/.fr/.de/.it/.co.uk/.ca/.es, Amazon and the Amazon logo are trademarks of Amazon, Inc. or its affiliates. Powered by WordPress and Our Blog Notebook Review Corners . 4 5 References ^ Home (notebookreviewcorners.tk) ^ Uncategorized (notebookreviewcorners.tk) ^ Products spec (notebookreviewcorners.tk) ^ WordPress (www.wordpress.org) ^ Notebook Review Corners (notebookreviewcorners.tk)
  • 2

  • 2015 Newest Dell Inspiron 5000 HD+ 17.3 Inch ... 2015 Newest Dell Inspiron 5000 HD+ 17.3 In . Laptop AMD A8 7410 Quad-Core 2.0GHz 4 GB RAM 1 TB Hard disk drive AMD Radeon R5 Graphics DVD/CD burner HDMI Wireless bluetooth Wifi Free Windows 10 upgrade-Silver Specifications and Review 17.3 Inch HD+ (1600 900) LED-lit Truelife Wide screen Display AMD A-Series A8-7410 (2.0GHz); AMD Radeon R5 Series Graphics; Windows 8.1 4 GB DDR3L SDRAM; 1TB 5400 rpm Hard Generate; Tray load Dvd and blu-ray Drive (Reads as well as Writes to DVD/CD) Wireless bluetooth 4.0 interface syncs with suitable devices; 1 USB 3.0 port efficiently utilizes the latest high-speed devices; Includes 2 USB 2.0 ports to connect additional accessories. HDMI result expands your watching options; Wireless and cable network connectivity; Built-in web cam with digital microphone Who Purchased 2015 Newest Dell Inspiron 5000 HD+ 17.3 In . Laptop AMD A8 7410 Quad-Core 2.0GHz 4 GB RAM 1 TB Hard disk drive AMD Radeon R5 Graphics DVD/CD burner HDMI Wireless bluetooth Wifi Free Windows 10 upgrade-Silver Additionally Reviews HP Pavilion 17-f233cl 17 TouchSmart Notebook PC Intel Core i5-5200U 2.2GHz 12GB 1TB DVDRW Windows 8.1 (Certified Refurbished) specifications Review Everyday computing got easier with the HP Pavilion 17-f233cl TouchSmart Laptop PC. Enjoy accurate reliability on the road or even at home with a simple, however powerful value-packed Notebook that will get the job done. Completely loaded with a Intel Core i5-5200U .. 2015 Latest HP Pavilion Premium High Performance 17.3-inch Laptop computer PC, HD+ Display (Sixteen hundred x 900), 5th Gen Intel Core i5-5200u Processor chip, 6GB DDR3L RAM, 1TB HDD, SuperMulti DVD Burners, HDMI, Windows 10 Review specs ? 17.3-inch HD+ BrightView WLED-backlit Show, 1600 x 900 HD+ quality. BrightView technology promotes the answers ? 5th Gen Intel? CoreTM i5-5200U Dual-core Processor ? 6GB program memory for dependable multi tasking ? 1TB hard drive .. Newest Model Toshiba Satellite L75 17.3-inch Laptop computer, HD+ Widescreen Display, Intel Core i3-4005u, 6GB DDR3L RAM, 500GB Hard disk drive, DVD RW, HDMI, 802.11 BGN WiFi, Wireless bluetooth, Windows 10 Review and product specifications Enjoy life bigtime. The 17.3 Satellite L75 laptop computer series offers large-scale style, worth and versatility, and provides every thing consumers need to keep in touch, productive, entertained-and more. It is ideal for students, households and small or even ho .. 2015 Newest HP 17z-p100 17.3-inch Laptop AMD Quad Core A8 Processor, 6GB Memory, 750GB Hard Drive, Web cam, HDMI, DVD Generate, USB 3.0, Windows 10 Review and specs This HP laptop is all about getting the ideal combination of design, dependability, and features. Style as well as productivity while keeping your bank account in mind right now that s something to obtain excited about. Expansion slot machines: 1 multi-format SD media car.. 2015 Latest Dell Inspiron 17 5000 Series 5758 Laptop, 17.3-inch LED Back-lit Display, 5th Era i7-5500U, 8GB DDR3, 1TB HDD, DVDRW, Non-Touch, Windows 8 Expert (Certified Refurbished) versus Features & Design: The actual Inspiron 17 is the most economical family member, offering a great mixture of portability and plenty of display real estate along with a 10-key number keypad next to the computer keyboard. Operating System .. Dell Inspiron i5759-4129BLK 17.3 Inch Laptop computer (6th Generation Intel Core i5, 8 Gigabyte RAM, 1 TB HDD) Review and specifications The Inspiron 17 7000 Series supplies a big view and large power with high overall performance. Get yours these days ..
  • 2016 Guide: Best Apple Laptops and Desktops for Students Apple computers have been fixtures in classrooms since before today's students were born actually, since before some of today's students' parents were born. Nowadays, Macs are a natural choice for scholars raised on iTunes or those seldom seen without their iPads or iPhones, thanks to the close ties between Apple's OS X (now called macOS 1 , for laptops and desktops) and iOS (tablet/phone) operating systems, as well as the iCloud storage service. Macs, under certain circumstances, are also better deals than you might suspect, in part thanks to Apple's education-specific pricing. Oftentimes, Apple offers £20 to £300 discounts for college students, parents buying for college students, faculty at all grade levels, and home-school teachers. You might find this special pricing via the institution itself (at a physical or virtual campus bookstore or computer store), but you can also browse education discounts at Apple's own online Education Store 2 . In addition, Macs come with much of the software students need, whether they'll be laying down music tracks in GarageBand; editing a video in iMovie; or putting together reports, spreadsheets, and presentations in Pages, Numbers, and Keynote respectively. The latter three lack the extreme depth of features of Microsoft Office, but they are prettier and arguably easier to use. And, of course, if you need Office, you can buy it for the Mac and if you desire (or a class requires) a particular Windows app, you can buy Microsoft's OS and run it on the Mac, a turnabout trick that PCs can't match. Here in summer 2016, of the current Mac pantheon we consider six Mac systems particularly good picks for students: two screen sizes apiece in the dorm-room-ready iMac desktop line and superportable MacBook Air laptop line, the even more ultraportable new 2016 MacBook, and one of the power-focused MacBook Pro laptops. Plus, this summer, if you purchase a Mac directly from Apple, certain models come gratis with a pair of Beats headphones. First, the MacBooks Let's start with the laptops. Our favorite for carrying around campus is Apple's archetypal mix of lightweight portability and long battery life, the MacBook Air. The 11-inch MacBook Air 3 , which has an 11.6-inch, 1,366x768 screen, weighs just 2.4 pounds, making it easy to slip into a backpack or bag. It offers a comfortable keyboard, a bright display, and better-than-all-day battery life nearly 11 hours in our tests for lecture-hall and library note-taking. It starts at £849 under Apple's education pricing scheme 4 . Like its smaller sibling, the 13-inch MacBook Air 5 hasn't changed much over the last two or three years. It has seen minor price adjustments (now starting at £949) and upward CPU-speed and architecture bumps, but it has kept its relatively low-resolution (1,440x900-pixel) display. But the 13-inch (really 13.3-inch) Air shares the 11-inch model's ultra-slim (0.68-inch) wedge profile, and at a hair under three pounds, it's virtually as portable. Plus, it has the SD-card slot whose omission is one of our very few gripes with the smaller Air. And its battery life is even better nearly 15 hours of real-world use when we reviewed the 2015 model. No wonder it's still the top target of Windows ultrabook designers everywhere. MacBook Pro With Retina Display If even 2.4 pounds is too heavy for you, Cupertino's lightest laptop is just 2.03 pounds. The new Apple MacBook 6 (simply "MacBook," no suffix) is a bit more expensive, starting at £1,249, but a real showpiece, with a sharp 12-inch Retina display with 2,304x1,440 resolution. This machine is so leading-edge that it has just one port. It's a tiny USB 3.1 Type-C, used for both physical connectivity and recharging the laptop. Our biggest beef with this luxe laptop is just that: having just one port. You'll need to invest in adapters or a hub to plug in a monitor or USB flash drive while charging up. If you crave true desktop-replacement capability but still want a laptop you can tote across campus or take home for a weekend (at 4.5 pounds, it's one of the lightest in its class), the Apple for you is the 15-inch MacBook Pro With Retina Display 7 . It's not cheap, starting at £1,899. But it's nonetheless one of the best laptops Computer Shopper has ever tested, for everything from its quad-core Intel Core i7 performance to its razor-sharp 2,880x1,800 screen a professional-caliber system that'll easily take you through four years of college. (There's also a 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro 8 , but we think its main appeal Retina resolution in a smaller size has been taken by the new MacBook.) On the Desktop: The iMac Lineup The iMac is Apple's famous all-in-one desktop that fits the computer components into the barely bulging back of a flat-panel monitor. Here in summer 2016, it's available in two screen sizes: the 21.5-inch iMac 9 , starting at £1,049 (though we most recently tested the £1,499 model with a stunning 4K-resolution display), and the 27-inch iMac, starting at £1,799. (On the bigger iMac, we prefer the £1,999 model 10 with a spectacular Retina 5K display with 5,120x2,880 resolution.) Apple iMac with Retina 5K Display The iMacs do have some limitations or potential frustrations. To make their super-slim designs possible, their USB ports and SD card slots are located, inconveniently, around the back. You can't upgrade the 21.5-inch model's memory (or any other internal component). Though the Retina 5K display is to die for, neither iMac has the HDMI-in port found on many Windows all-in-ones, which would let you use the screen with a dorm-room game console or other video source. But if you want a one-piece, one-stop-computing solution, they're about as nice as desktop PCs get. (Asus' Zen AiO Pro 11 gets pretty close, on the Windows side of the computing world.) For the record, if you don't want a one-piece solution if you already have a monitor, keyboard, and mouse but the computer that once went with them is too old or underpowered to cut it for college you're a candidate for Apple's smallest and most affordable desktop, the Mac Mini 12 (£499 and up). Though not one of our six Apple picks, it crams a bushel of engineering into a 7.7-inch-square, 1.4-inch-tall aluminum package. The most tempting option available for it: the 1TB Fusion Drive (also available in the iMacs), which seamlessly and automatically melds a hard drive and solid-state storage for optimum performance. What About an iPad Pro? Opting for an iPad (along with a keyboard case) instead of a full-fledged laptop or desktop may sound appealing at first, thanks to the comparatively low cost of entry, long battery life, and light weight. And relying on an iPad for productivity is more feasible these days, thanks to Apple's introduction of its iPad Pro 13 tablets. These iOS-based models, available in laptop-size 12.9-inch and iPad-ordinary 9.7-inch screen sizes, are designed for multitasking, with support for the Apple Pencil 14 active stylus. If you're used to iPadding, you may consider making an iPad Pro your main computing squeeze. Note, though, that pricing will rise dramatically once you add Apple's Smart Keyboard 15 cover (an essential option at £149 to £169, if you want to type anything longer than a text), the £99 Apple Pencil, or other accessories, making a kitted-out iPad cost as much as (or more than) a MacBook Air. And if any of your classes requires the use of specific software that's designed to run on a Mac or Windows PC, it's not going to work with your iPad Pro, although Microsoft's Word and other Office apps are available via iTunes. So though an iPad Pro plus a Smart Keyboard may look like a laptop substitute, know that it has some key limitations. References ^ macOS (www.apple.com) ^ Apple's own online Education Store (www.apple.com) ^ Apple MacBook Air 11 (2014) (www.computershopper.com) ^ under Apple's education pricing scheme (www.apple.com) ^ Apple MacBook Air 13 (2013) (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple MacBook (2015) (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple MacBook Pro 15 Retina (2013) (www.computershopper.com) ^ 13-inch version of the MacBook Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple iMac 21.5-inch (2014) (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple iMac with Retina 5K Display (2015) (www.computershopper.com) ^ Zen AiO Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple Mac Mini (2014) (www.computershopper.com) ^ iPad Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ Apple Pencil (www.apple.com) ^ Smart Keyboard (www.apple.com)
  • 2016 Guide: The Best 17-Inch Gaming Notebooks When it comes to computing gear, bigger is sometimes indeed better, especially when it comes to gaming. It s hard to beat gaming on a big screen. Today s largest gaming notebooks sport 17.3-inch (and in rare instances, larger) screens. An often-underappreciated aspect of those ample chassis, though, is that they allow these laptops to fit the most powerful bleeding-edge technology. Heat dissipation is often what keeps high-end hardware out of laptops, but we ve seen some beastly models sport full-power desktop processors, and more notably, Nvidia s GeForce GTX 980 mobile desktop graphics card. Yes, all that in a portable computer. (Well, a computer that s more portable than a desktop, at any rate). Notebooks this large, of course, aren t your daily travelers. Most of them weigh in the neighborhood of eight or more pounds, and you ll need to go shopping for a roller bag or oversize laptop backpack to transport them. Exclusive of their size, however, today s 17.3-inch gaming notebooks are more hospitable to use in mobile fashion, off-plug, than those of past years. We ve seen a few reach seven or more hours of battery life. (Mind you, that's in everyday productivity use; gaming will trim that number considerably.) Even half of that would have been unheard of several years back. Cooling has improved across the board as well; it s rare we have any thermal issues during the review process, though some machines blow their fans louder than others. EVGA's SC17 packs overclockable hardware in a thin frame. On the performance front, gaming notebooks have narrowed, though not closed, the gap between them and their desktop brothers. Standard mobile graphics are now within 70 to 80 percent of the desktop cards they re based on. It s actually a literal dead heat in the exclusive semi-portable notebooks that house desktop-class components, like the aforementioned mobile desktop GTX 980. It s a heck of a feat, and it didn t happen overnight. Although technology itself changes quickly, the top tech always seems to be expensive. That s even truer with notebooks than desktops, since it costs more to engineer smaller components that fit into today's laptops' tight tolerances. As a result, you could spend £3,000 or more on a big-screen gaming notebook without looking too hard. However, it s by no means a requirement to spend that much if you re looking for a quality gameplay experience. In this article, we ll be taking a look at a few more budget-minded notebooks, some down around the £1,000 mark. This year brings new challenges for the PC gaming industry. With the advent of 3K (3,200x1,800-pixel) and 4K (3,840x2,160) ultra-high-resolution displays, and a few odd resolutions in between, mobile graphics chips simply can t be fast enough . As a matter of fact, today s solutions simply aren t! Some exclusive gaming notebooks sport twin graphics processors in SLI, but even they can be overtaxed at the highest pixel counts. For now, the sweet spot for performance and quality is full HD, or FHD (1,920x1,080). Without spending a fortune, you can get a gaming notebook that provides you with a great visual experience at that resolution. Lenovo's Ideapad Y700 starts at just north of £1,000. As with other classes of notebooks, gaming notebooks are sold in different tiers. Expect to spend about £1,000 to £1,200 for a basic gaming notebook with a 17.3-inch screen. Another 50 percent on top of that will get you a considerably more capable model, one that can run today s games more or less maxed out. And for about £2,000, you can pick from among some of the most powerful gaming notebooks on the market, although the true elite models can easily top £4,000. But first, let s see what specific components you should target when shopping for a gaming notebook. Buying Basics: Gaming Notebooks Unlike desktops, notebooks generally aren t upgradable outside of their primary system memory (RAM, not to be confused with the graphics memory) and in some cases, the storage. You re going to be stuck with the screen, graphics chip, and processor you opt for, so choose wisely. If you can stretch your budget a bit to get the next-tier component, it can pay dividends in terms of usable life. Expect your gaming notebook to stay relevant (as in, capable of playing the latest games at high detail and resolution settings) for about two years, perhaps a bit more for a higher-end notebook. Naturally, the faster the notebook (especially in the graphics sense), the longer it ll be able to play games at the higher quality settings. You ll want to focus on getting a system that s more than just good enough for today s games, as you can bet the ranch that good-enough performance probably won t be good enough in a year or two. GRAPHICS PROCESSOR. The dedicated graphics chip (made by Nvidia or AMD) is the backbone of any gaming computer. You may spot AMD integrated graphics solutions in some machines (these laptops tend to use AMD's A- or E-Series processors with built-in graphics), but few gaming-geared machines in 2016 use dedicated AMD graphics. Gaming notebooks in 2016 are almost exclusively powered by Nvidia GeForce GTX graphics chips. At this writing, the entry-level GeForce gaming chip is the GeForce GTX 960M, typically found in models starting around £1,000. It s capable of playing most of today s games at an FHD resolution with medium settings. Keep in mind that the GTX 960M is just on the edge of playability at that resolution. If you can spend a few hundred more and step up to a GeForce GTX 970M, we d highly recommend it. It has up to 50 percent better performance at high resolutions relative to the GTX 960M. You ll generally have a hard time finding a gaming notebook with a GTX 970M for less than £1,500, with well-equipped models hitting around £1,700. Inside Origin's EON17-SLX, which uses a monster GeForce GTX 980. The GeForce GTX 980M is the next step up from there, and generally the fastest you ll find in any normal gaming notebook. (More on what constitutes "normal" in a moment.) The 980M is found almost exclusively in £2,000-and-up notebooks. It s almost as much of a step up from the GTX 970M as the GTX 970M is from the GTX 960M. This monster is unquestionably capable of pushing through today s games without compromising one setting, at least at FHD. If you re always playing the most cutting-edge games, and your laptop of choice offers a screen resolution higher than FHD, it could be worth the extra dough. For the truly adventurous (and deep-pocketed), Nvidia has released a mobile desktop version of its desktop GeForce GTX 980 graphics card. It s simply called the GeForce GTX 980, without the M, because it is a desktop graphics card, yet it fits in a notebook. It s the fastest single-card solution available in a notebook at this time, but it won t come cheap. Take a look at Origin s gigantic EON17-SLX 1 to see how fast and expensive it gets. It s the sole mobile card that can play at well above FHD without fiddling with the settings too much. The beastly Origin EON17-SLX. SCREEN. Two specs are of interest when discussing 17.3-inch screens: resolution and panel quality. Most screens this size have an FHD (1,920x1,080 pixels) resolution, which is ideal for the latest games. You ll have trouble finding even a high-end gaming notebook capable of producing playable frame rates much beyond this resolution at high settings. Budget models will pretty much exclusively have FHD, while some pricier models into the £2,000 range may have 3K or 4K displays. You can, of course, run games at a lower resolution on a higher-resolution display, but the picture usually won t look as sharp. It s hard to go wrong sticking with FHD. The other spec to watch for is panel type. You ll want to go for an in-plane switching (IPS) panel if at all possible, as they generally offer the best viewing angles and colors. They're not as common at the 17-inch size as on smaller screens. Also uncommon is touch-screen input. It's generally not a standard feature in gaming laptops, especially at the largest screen sizes. One optional spec that s nice to have in a gaming notebook screen is support for Nvidia's G-Sync technology. This can help smooth out how the game looks onscreen by locking the refresh rate of the display to what the video card is capable of. It s a more important feature on gaming notebooks that push 60 frames per second or more consistently, like those with GTX 980M graphics. Take a look at our teardown on the G-Sync technology (and AMD's competing FreeSync) here 2 . PROCESSOR/CPU. Today s games, especially of the MMORPG and real-time-strategy (RTS) varieties, tend to hammer the processor. Dual-core processors generally aren t found in gaming notebooks, for good reason: Some newer games explicitly call for quad-core CPUs. The ideal processor choice in a gaming notebook is the Intel Core i7-6700HQ quad-core. It s readily available even in some lower-priced models. It runs at 2.5GHz, and can Turbo Boost to 3.5GHz under the right thermal conditions. It s well-suited to all of today s games. For the more budget-conscious, you could look for a machine equipped with a Core i5-6300HQ quad-core, which shouldn t have any problems with today s games, either. The Core i7-6700HQ won t add much to the price, though, and it has the advantage of being able to process eight threads, versus four on the Core i5-6300HQ, thanks to its support for Intel's Hyper-Threading feature. This gives the Core i7-6700HQ an advantage in games that can take advantage of multiple concurrent processing threads. MEMORY/RAM. The minimum amount of memory you ll want in a gaming notebook is 8GB. Memory is one component that s usually upgradable after purchase, so you can skimp if it means shuffling funds to a faster graphics chip or main processor. Thoroughly research to find out if the memory is indeed user-upgradable before making assumptions, though. The memory banks of the Asus Republic of Gamers G752VT, exposed. Given how inexpensive large amounts of memory have become, it s common to see 16GB even in midrange-priced gaming notebooks, and 32GB in the pricier models. Remember, 8GB is the minimum. We d go with 16GB if possible; it s the ideal balance between price and performance. 32GB is overkill for gaming, though it could be useful for other demanding applications. STORAGE. In terms of gaming performance, the storage subsystem mainly affects game loading and in-game level changes. It can be of special importance in MMORPGs, where huge environments are loaded in real time. Thus, having fast SSD-based storage becomes desirable. The advantage with a 17.3-inch gaming notebook is that, because of their big chassis, they usually have two storage options. You can opt for a dual-drive approach, with a smaller SSD to store the operating system and a few games, and a large, economical hard drive for all of your games that don t need quick loading times. In terms of SSDs, you should only opt for an SSD boot drive at this point in time; the performance "feel" between a hard drive and an SSD boot drive is just too great. Some SSDs now come on compact M.2 modules (which are the size of a gumstick), but they aren't inherently faster than ordinary SSDs unless they specifically support a PCI Express interface and/or the NVMe protocol. These are the speed buzzwords to watch out for these days in laptop storage. Gaming Notebooks: The Key Makers and Models There s no shortage of gaming notebooks to choose from, so we ll take this on a per-make basis. ACER. You ll usually see Acer s name on smaller, budget-priced notebooks, Chromebooks, and desktops, but the relatively new Acer Predator gaming notebook line is, as our latest reviews show, sublime. The Acer Predator 17 3 is the company s most fearsome offering, living every bit up to its name. This is one of the largest and most powerful notebooks on the market, available with a Core i7-6700HQ processor, GeForce GTX 980M graphics, 32GB of RAM, and 512GB of PCI Express SSD storage. It furthermore has one of the best keyboards we ve used on any gaming notebook, and stellar speakers. It s pricey, at £2,599 in our test configuration, but it's hard to argue you don t get a solid value. (Also check out our spring 2016 preview of the Predator 17X 4 , Acer's next generation of this laptop.) ASUS. Asus Republic of Gamers (RoG) brand spans both its desktop and notebook products. Our experience with the RoG gaming notebooks has been mostly positive, especially with the recently-reviewed 17.3-inch Republic of Gamers G752VT 5 . Asus generally goes all-out on gamer-targeted design, more so than other makes. At £1,799, the G752VT-DH72 model we reviewed delivered solid gameplay, with one of the quietest cooling systems you ll find on a big-time gaming notebook. Its Nvidia G-Sync-compatible display is first-rate, too. The same model series is offered with a GTX 980M for a few hundred more. Asus Republic of Gamers G752VT LENOVO. Lenovo is the budget gamer s best friend. The PC giant's newly revamped IdeaPad Y700 (17-Inch) 6 offers outstanding value, starting at just over £1,000. (Be sure to look for online coupons and limited-time markdowns; Lenovo's pricing fluctuates all the time.) That includes a beautiful FHD IPS display, Core i7-6700HQ quad-core processor, and Nvidia s GTX 960M graphics. Our £1,199 review model included 16GB of RAM, plus a 128GB SSD/1TB hard drive combo. It also got seven-and-a-half hours of battery life in our video-playback battery rundown test. That s tough to beat. (See also our preview of the Lenovo Ideapad Y900 7 , the company's coming flagship, from CES 2016.) Light-up keys on the Lenovo IdeaPad Y700. GIGABYTE. Taiwan-based Gigabyte offers more subtle-looking gaming notebooks, with a high level of quality and performance. If you're not into red LEDs and other "gamer" bling, the sober Gigabyte P57W 8 will be one of the better values you ll find in the 17.3-inch market, with a Core i7-6700HQ, GTX 970M, and 16GB of RAM for £1,699. If you re looking for something fancier and more gamer-styled, Gigabyte s sub-brand, Aorus, offers a few exclusive big-screen models, among them the dual-graphics Aorus X7 Pro 9 . EVGA. Traditionally the tuners of Nvidia desktop graphics cards, and producers of power supplies and motherboards, EVGA is now in the gaming-notebook market. The EVGA SC17 10 is the company's one and only offering, at least for now. It s far from inexpensive (our review unit clocked in at £2,699), but it gives you a fully overclockable Core i7-6820HK unlocked processor, GTX 980M 8GB graphics, a stunning 4K display, and an all-aluminum chassis. Its BIOS even allows you to tweak the XMP profiles on its 32GB of DDR4-2666 memory, if you re so inclined. If you can spend this much on a gaming notebook, the SC17 is a great ride. MSI. Like Asus, MSI is also known across the notebook and desktop industry for its gaming-centric components. Its laptop line more fully embraces the gaming aesthetic than any other. Even MSI's "budget" gaming notebooks offer aluminum-clad exteriors, FHD displays, and SteelSeries-designed keyboards with multi-colored backlighting. The GT72 Dominator Pro 11 , an evolution of the company's flagship machine, offers top-notch performance for £2,099, with a Core i7 processor, GTX 980M graphics, a G-Sync display, and 16GB of RAM. It s none-too-shabby-looking, either. ( See our preview of the next-generation version, the MSI GT73 Titan 12 , exhibited at Computex Taipei in June 2016.) Keyboard lighting on the MSI GT72 Dominator Pro. Plus, MSI offers a killer outlier of a big-screen gaming machine in the GT80 Titan SLI 13 , a brutally large and heavy 18.4-inch-screened behemoth with a full-size true Cherry mechanical keyboard built in, dual GTX 980M graphics, and a clever touch pad to the right of the keyboard that transforms into a number pad. It's about as non-portable as today's big gaming laptops come, but it's quite the processing and gaming brute, and a dream to play and type on. (See also our preview of the GT80's successor, the GT83 Titan 14 , from Computex 2016.) References ^ Origin s gigantic EON17-SLX (www.computershopper.com) ^ our teardown on the G-Sync technology (and AMD's competing FreeSync) here (www.computershopper.com) ^ Acer Predator 17 (www.computershopper.com) ^ check out our spring 2016 preview of the Predator 17X (www.computershopper.com) ^ 17.3-inch Republic of Gamers G752VT (www.computershopper.com) ^ IdeaPad Y700 (17-Inch) (www.computershopper.com) ^ our preview of the Lenovo Ideapad Y900 (www.computershopper.com) ^ Gigabyte P57W (www.computershopper.com) ^ Aorus X7 Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ EVGA SC17 (www.computershopper.com) ^ GT72 Dominator Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ See our preview of the next-generation version, the MSI GT73 Titan (www.computershopper.com) ^ GT80 Titan SLI (www.computershopper.com) ^ our preview of the GT80's successor, the GT83 Titan (www.computershopper.com)
  • 2016 Guide: The Best 17-Inch Laptops Can a laptop replace a desktop PC or be your only computer? That question was settled years ago yes, absolutely . Can a laptop, in fact, outperform your desktop? Unless your desktop is a nearly new, top-of-the-line Godzilla gaming rig or workstation, that's a "yes," too. In fact, you may be startled by what you can get from one of mobile computing's top power tools: a 17-inch laptop. Lenovo Ideapad Y700 (17-Inch) Two different audiences or groups of users swear by 17-inch notebooks. First are folks who seek the most desktop-like experience from their desktop-replacement systems: While no laptop has the expandability or upgradability of a big tower desktop, a number of 17-inch models provide component access to let you upgrade the RAM or the onboard storage. (And all make room for more ports and features than smaller systems, by the very nature of their bigger chassis.) More important for daily use, though, their screens and keyboards are the biggest and most comfortable available in the notebook arena. Because of the wide body required to make room for the giant screen, the keyboard will typically have a full numeric keypad, like on a desktop keyboard. The second group consists of gamers. A thriving class of 17-inch laptops courts the hard-core with speedy CPUs and dedicated graphics, as well as all the bells and whistles required to create space civilizations or battle zombie hordes. If sleek ultrabooks and convertibles are the sports cars, these are the beefy muscle cars or tricked-out SUVs of the mobile world. But Yes, 17 Inches Is Huge Of course, the words "beefy" and "portable" rarely go together. Seen on one of those quadrant diagrams, 17-inch laptops would be far along the capability axis but near the bottom in mobility. At seven to eight pounds or more, they're more luggable than liftable occasionally hauled down the hall to a conference-room presentation or stuffed into a backpack for a gaming party, but almost never seen in coffee shops or on airline tray tables. MSI's GE72 6QD Apache Pro: a "budget" gaming 17-incher. They're rarely seen away from AC power outlets, either. The typical battery life is just three or four hours, compared to six or eight for slimmer travelers. Finally, while some 17-inch consumer notebooks are affordably priced under £700, all bets are off in the elite gaming segment, where with just a few exceptions, £1,500 is a bargain and topliners can climb past £3,000. (That trend may be breaking, though. We recently looked at a pair of legit under-£1,500 17-inch gaming machines, in the form of the Lenovo Ideapad Y700 17.3-inch 1 and the MSI GE72 Apache Pro 2 .) Nevertheless, the best 17-inch laptops deliver a luxurious and powerful computing experience, with big-screen, easy-on-the-eyes viewing for videos and office apps and serious chops for multimedia work such as video editing. Let's take a quick look at what a king-size laptop can give you. DISPLAY RESOLUTION & TECHNOLOGY. The term "17-inch laptop" is actually a generic one for this size class; most screens in this segment actually measure 17.3 inches on the diagonal. (Biggest exception? The outlier MSI GT80 Titan SLI 3 's display, which we're including in this XXL class, is a whopping 18.4 inches.) Almost all offer screen resolutions of full HD or 1,920x1,080 (often abbreviated "FHD" or "1080p"). One thing to know about 17-inch-class screens: Despite the prevalence of the touch-friendly Windows 10 in these machines, and the equally touch-centric Windows 8 before it, touch screens in laptops of this size are rare. Also, in-plane switching (IPS) technology, which allows for broader viewing angles on smaller displays, is even rarer. It's a good idea to look at any 17-inch screen in person, if you can, to make sure you're satisfied with the viewing angles and general appearance before buying. Also, you'll usually see matte screens, as opposed to glossy ones, in this size class. They will also tend to have chunkier bezels than most and a recessed panel, as opposed to edge-to-edge glass. CHOOSING THE G RAPHICS PROCESSOR (GPU). Though fine for productivity apps and casual gaming, the integrated graphics built into today's Intel and AMD CPUs can't cut it for serious gaming or other pixel-pushing, so look for a dedicated graphics chip if you mean to play any kind of serious games on your 17-incher. The most common gaming-grade chips at this writing in 17-inch laptops were the Nvidia GeForce GTX 950M, GTX 960M, GTX 965M, GTX 970M, and GTX 980M. (The AMD Radeon R7 M360 has also made an appearance in the occasional AMD-powered laptop from HP and Lenovo, but dedicated AMD GPUs are otherwise scarce in late-model big-screen laptops.) The dual-GPU Aorus X7 Pro At this writing, Nvidia had recently announced a step up from its mobile graphics flagship, the GeForce GTX 980M, called the GTX 980 (without the "M," just like the desktop version of the chip). This is actually a desktop -equivalent version of the GTX 980 meant for mobile use, appearing in gonzo gaming machines like the liquid-cooled Asus Republic of Gamers GX700 4 and the Origin EON17-SLX 5 . Benchmarking on the Origin machine showed the GTX 980 graphics chip to be a beast. That may be the best chip you can get if you're a gamer, but a few exotic gaming rigs even feature dual graphics adapters akin to their Nvidia SLI or AMD CrossFire desktop cousins. The Aorus X7 Pro 6 , for one, has a pair of GeForce GTX 970M GPUs, and MSI vends a near-£5,000 version of its GT80 Titan SLI with two GTX 980 (note, not GTX 980M!) graphics chips aboard. Now, a configuration like that will give anyone GPU envy. But the thing to bear in mind? You should match up the native resolution of the screen in your 17-inch laptop to an appropriately powerful graphics chip, and not let that bleed into overkill. Most 17-inch screens will feature a 1080p native resolution, and the sweet spot for PC gaming at that resolution is a GeForce GTX 960M, GTX 965M, or GTX 970M chip. Assuming that PC gaming matters to you, you probably don't need a GTX 980 or GTX 980M for gaming on that screen unless you're looking to future-proof your laptop for years out, or you intend to run your game on an external monitor (or monitors) with a higher native resolution than the screen in the laptop itself. C PU, MEMORY, & STORAGE. While some economy 17-inch models sport value processors such as Intel's Core i3, the 17-inch norm is a quad-core powerhouse like the Core i7-4710HQ or its "Skylake"/6th-Generation Core i7-6000-series equivalents, which have become the norm in new gaming laptops in 2016. A few boutique systems from the likes of Origin PC or Eurocom laugh at the very notion of battery power by using overclocked desktop chips (typically, a Core i7), but these are appropriate only for desk-bound video editors and others who need the most raw processing power available for media-centric editing and crunching/conversion tasks. To our eyes, if you're looking at a stacked gaming configuration, you're probably going to get a Core i5 or Core i7 chip by default. MSI's beastly GT80 Titan SLI Like with the CPU, entry-level laptops may make do with 4GB of system memory, but 8GB or more is far preferable. Because of the chassis size, you are more likely than on most sizes of laptop to have access to the RAM bays via a hatch or removable lid on the underside of the machine, so it's good to look for this upgradability in advance if you think you might want to boost the RAM later on. As for storage, look for at least a 500GB and preferably a 1TB hard drive and for performance-oriented gaming rigs, a 1TB hard drive plus at least one solid-state drive to speed the booting-up process and program loads. You can go overboard in this regard; configurations of the MSI GT72 Dominator Pro 7 are available with an outrageous four SSDs in a RAID array. But in 2016, we think an SSD boot drive is a near necessity in anything but the most budget-oriented laptop configurations, and in a 17-inch laptop, the laptop maker doesn't have the excuse that there's not enough room for an SSD and a hard drive inside. One of the benefits of a 17-inch laptop is that most models are also big enough to host an optical drive, an endangered species on smaller laptops, even many 15-inch models. Upscale models also boast Blu-ray rather than DVD drives, the better to enjoy 1080p movies on their sparkling screens, and subwoofers to make the most of music, movies, and game audio. K EYBOARD. We alluded to it earlier, but 17-inch laptops have space for some of the best keyboards in portable computing, with numeric keypads for spreadsheet jockeys and, in some models, dedicated macro keys for gaming junkies. Alienware's gaming rigs are famous not just for backlit keyboards, but keyboards with multiple multicolored customizable lighting zones. A 17-inch keyboard deck also lets the keys spread out; we especially liked the well-isolated design of the arrow-key cluster on the new Acer Predator 17 8 gaming laptop. The keyboard (and isolated arrow-key "T") of the Acer Predator 17. There's also the issue of key travel; big 17-inchers have more vertical room for comfortable key travel than most laptops. But you'll want to try before you buy to make sure the laptop maker took advantage of the bigger chassis and passed on the benefits to the keyboard. MSI is one laptop maker that generally gets that part right. Many MSI laptop keyboards are designed in concert with SteelSeries, a leading manufacturer of gaming peripherals; and the MSI GT80 Titan is the only notebook we know of on the market at this writing with a genuine mechanical keyboard, with the clicky switches that gamers love. ( Lenovo's upcoming Ideapad Y900 9 will join that elite group of one later this year.) References ^ Lenovo Ideapad Y700 17.3-inch (www.computershopper.com) ^ MSI GE72 Apache Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ MSI GT80 Titan SLI (www.computershopper.com) ^ Asus Republic of Gamers GX700 (www.computershopper.com) ^ Origin EON17-SLX (www.computershopper.com) ^ Aorus X7 Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ MSI GT72 Dominator Pro (www.computershopper.com) ^ Acer Predator 17 (www.computershopper.com) ^ Lenovo's upcoming Ideapad Y900 (www.computershopper.com)
  • 2016 Guide: The Best Cheap Gaming Laptops There's finding the Holy Grail. Then, there's the Ark of the Covenant. And then , there's finding a serious gaming laptop that's both future-proof and doesn't cost a bundle. Not long ago, you might as well have hunted for one in that fabled Indiana Jones warehouse full of crates. MSI's GE72 Apache Pro: £1,299 in our test configuration, a big-screen, budget 17.3-incher. Back just a few years, a gaming laptop capable of playing the very latest PC games at decently high detail settings cost an easy £2,000 or more, if you wanted a model that would be viable for more than a year or two. Today, things have changed a bit though the degree of change does depend on how you define a gaming laptop. Here at Computer Shopper, we don't consider any machine a true gaming laptop unless it comes with a dedicated graphics chipset . The lines are a little blurry here, mind you. That's because plenty of older games and casual games will run just fine on the integrated graphics that are a part of the latest CPUs from Intel and AMD, particularly if you dial back the games' detail settings and resolution. A plain value: Gigabyte's P55W v4, £1,299 as tested, takes it easy on styling. If that's the extent of your gaming, you might be able to get by with a cheaper laptop that doesn't have its own dedicated graphics chip at all and relies on that circuitry that's part of the CPU. The best integrated graphics to be found at this writing are the various HD Graphics aboard some of Intel's late-model "Skylake" 6th-Generation processors, as well as the seldom-seen Iris flavors of integrated graphics that were a part of a few chips in Intel's 5th-Generation Core ("Broadwell") processor line. (Mostly, they were used in MacBooks.) And let's not forget the variants of Radeon integrated graphics that are part of AMD's A series mobile processors, seen in the occasional low-end or midrange laptop. Mobile Graphics Chips: The Big Differentiators For real gaming, however, you'll want a dedicated graphics chip. On an AMD CPU-based laptop, this will be a Radeon chipset with the designation "M" for mobile. That said, gaming laptops that are all-AMD (that is, with both an AMD CPU and a dedicated AMD graphics chip) are pretty scarce here in 2016. Dell's Inspiron 15 7559: A £799 budget machine with GeForce GTX 960M. It's a bit different on machines that use an Intel CPU. Any dedicated graphics will be the mobile versions of either an AMD Radeon M200- or M300-series chip or ( much more commonly, these days) Nvidia's GeForce silicon. Nvidia, too, uses an "M" to differentiate its laptop and desktop graphics parts. In current laptops for sale, you may see some last-generation GeForce 800M series GPUs, but the new stuff is the GeForce 900M series. The higher-end GPUs in both lines are prefaced with "GTX." The 900M series ranges from the GeForce 920M up to the GeForce GTX 980M; the GeForce GTX 960M and up is where serious gamers will want to start paying attention. (You might recall that older Nvidia-based laptops signalled their lower-end GPUs with "GeForce GT"; not anymore.) You're not likely to find the top of Nvidia's or AMD's line in an under-£1,500 gaming laptop, but with luck, you can land two or three notches from the top. (Nvidia also now has a GeForce GTX 980 for laptops note, there's no "M" there, as it's a desktop-grade chip for laptops but you won't see it in low-cost gaming machines.) The landscape around budget gaming machines has changed quite a bit over the last year. Component maker Gigabyte has continued to release conservative-looking, good-value gaming units alongside machines from its Aorus brand, which offer more typical gaming-laptop styling and e-sports-centric extras like dedicated hardware encoders to assist with game streaming. Asus' Republic of Gamers brand now spans down into some budget models. MSI remains a leading player in this market, with models starting under £1,000 and rising to multiples of that. And Lenovo has established a solid presence in lower-end gaming machines with its late-2015 Ideapad Y700 models. In short: You no longer have to opt for third-string brands or end-of-life models in this price range. All of these brands offer viable new options under £1,500 now, and some under £1,000. (Even Dell itself has wiggled into that space, separately from its iconic Alienware gaming brand, with its highly intriguing Inspiron 15 7559 1 , a £799, GeForce GTX 960M-based unit.) Pricing & Buying Basics: What to Look For Which brings us to pricing. Our price range for cheap gaming laptops is a lot higher than for other kinds of cheap notebooks. A budget Windows laptop these days will go for £200 to £400. If you're looking for a laptop with a dedicated graphics chipset, most of these models start around £1,000 and reach to the skies, though you can find isolated models in the £750 to £1,000 range. Our filter, for the purposes of this "cheap" roundup, is from £800 to £1,500. Note, though, that most of the machines below you can find for more or less than the cited prices because many are available in multiple or customizable configurations. Take the selections we've made below as just a starting point as suggestions for the laptop lines and vendors to investigate. Here are the key criteria to look for in low-cost gaming machines. PROCESSOR & RAM. A maxed-out CPU like an Intel Core i7 is less crucial for budget gaming than it is for processor-intensive tasks like video editing or media-file production work. On the AMD side of the fence, in the rare gaming laptops you'll find based on AMD CPUs, gamers will see mostly AMD A10 chips paired with an AMD Radeon chip. (We haven't tested any of these of late, but Lenovo recently introduced an AMD A10/Radeon R7 M380 version of its Ideapad Y700 2 , which we tested in Intel/Nvidia trim.) These won't provide world-beating productivity performance, but they're good picks for budget gaming. Lenovo's Ideapad Y700: Available in Intel/Nvidia or AMD trim. On the much more common Intel side, the grade of the dedicated GPU is more important than the specific CPU, assuming you're getting one of the 5th-Generation "Broadwell" or 6th-Generation "Skylake" Intel Core chips, either a Core i5 or a Core i7. We've seen decent battery-life results from these chips as a whole, especially combined with late-model Nvidia GPUs, but these are gaming laptops, and gamers will tend to spend most of their time near an AC outlet. Gaming laptops have been notorious, as a class, for running just a couple of hours off their batteries, but chips and power management have gotten better over the years. You can't expect a full day of battery life from a gaming machine, but things have improved. Meanwhile, on the memory front, 4GB is the usual minimum these days, but 8GB is a good upper target. Much beyond that will deliver diminishing returns for games and boost the price, which is a concern for systems in this price range. Every dollar needs to count. STORAGE. A year or two ago, you'd be dealing strictly with ordinary hard drives, rather than smaller but speedier solid-state drives (SSDs), in gaming machines in this price range. Hard drives still have their place, as games are among the most space-hogging programs out there, but an SSD boot drive, or an SSD boot drive paired with a second (platter) hard drive for mass storage is a much better solution to speed up perceived performance. SSDs and games are a great match; levels load faster, and games load more quickly than with hard drives, assuming the key game files are stored on the SSD. An SSD boot drive of at least 256GB is ideal (that space fills up faster than you'd think!), but in this price range, you're more likely to see 128GB SSDs, which can suffice if you manage the space well and uninstall games as you complete them. We like the 128GB SSD/1TB hard drive combination we saw in our £999, 15.6-inch screened Best Buy review unit of the Lenovo Ideapad Y700 we mentioned earlier. The Alienware 15: In our test unit, squeaked in under £1,500 with GeForce GTX 970M power. D ISPLAY SIZE & INPUT. Except for a handful of 14-inch slim-line models like the Razer Blade 3 or MSI GS40 Phantom 4 , cheap or not, most gaming laptops follow the "more is better" philosophy of screen space. That translates to 15.6- or 17.3-inch displays, usually with 1,920x1,080 resolution. (The 15.6-inch screen is an especially common match in this class of gaming laptops, as panel makers manage the greatest efficiencies when manufacturing displays at that size.) The 1,920x1,080 resolution, commonly called "1080p," is a good match for GeForce GTX 960M and GTX 970M graphics processors, which are the mobile-graphics sweet-spot choices for gaming at that resolution without much compromise on detail settings. Note, however, that touch-screen input is not the norm on gaming machines. If you want touch input (and it is undeniably handy for Windows 10), you'll have to shop carefully. References ^ Inspiron 15 7559 (www.computershopper.com) ^ Ideapad Y700 (www.computershopper.com) ^ Razer Blade (www.computershopper.com) ^ MSI GS40 Phantom (www.computershopper.com)
  • 20V 2A Laptop AC Adapter Battery Charger Power Supply Cord for Lenovo 40W Yoga 3 Pro, Yoga 3 Pro-1370, Yoga 3 11, Yoga 3-1170, Yoga 3-14, Yoga 3-1470, 100% Compatible with Lenovo P/N. ADL40WDD, ADL40WDA, ADL40WDJ, ADL40WDG, ADL40WDB, ADL40WDC, ADL40WDE, ADL40WCA, ADL40WCB, 80HE0049US, ADL40WCC, ADL40WCD, ADL40WCE, ADL40WCF, GX20H34904, ADL40WCG, ADL40WLE, ADL40WLF, ADL40WCH, ADL40WDH, ADL40WDH, ADL40WLA, ADL40WLB, ADL40WLC, ADL40WLD - Special Price
  • 20v 3.25a 65w in-car charger for Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13,IdeaPad Yoga 2 Pro,IdeaPad Flex 14,ADLX65NDC2A ADLX65NLC3A,ThinkPad X1 Carbon 3448 Series,Lenovo Yoga Series 11 11s 13,ThinkPad X1 Helix S3 S5 Series,ThinkPad X1 Carbon 3448 Series - Offer
  • 20V Charger for IBM Lenovo Thinkpad X61 X230 X220 Tablet - Original Lavolta Laptop AC Adapter Notebook Power Supply - Discount Price
  • 2nd 2.5 Inch HDD SSD Hard Drive Caddy Adapter 12.7mm SATA to SATA for HP Dell Acer BenQ ASUS Lenovo Laptops - Bonus Price
  • 3

  • 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition review VR, or virtual reality headsets that take things beyond the entry-level experiences of the Google Glass or Samsung Gear VR are usually pretty expensive. At a more affordable £400, the 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition 1 VR headset sits somewhere in the middle. So how middle-of-the-road does it turn out to be? To get to that price, the Chinese manufacturer cut some corners and is relying on its own content development along with the charity and interest of third-party developers to give consumers using the headset plenty to work with. We used it for almost two months and came away feeling like there was always something missing. Under the hood The 3Glasses D2 has a 5.5-inch TFT-LCD display, with 2K resolution (2,560 1,440) and pixel density of 534ppi. That s roughly 1080p in each eye, with a 110-degree field of view, putting it in line with other VR headsets like the HTC Vive 2 and Oculus Rift 3 , albeit with a modest, 60Hz refresh rate. It s somewhat offset by a 13-millisecond response time, but the mix in specs here does have consequences for usability. Related: Google s Daydream could be the Gear VR s worst nightmare 4 The D2 doesn t have positional tracking, so the content on it isn t going to require much footwork. Instead, it uses a combination of accelerometers and angular rate sensors to more precisely measure head movement. Ted Kritsonis/Digital Trends Ted Kritsonis/Digital Trends The headset has an HDMI and USB 2.0 plug protruding out of it, so connections are pretty straightforward, in that respect. Weighing 8.7 ounces, it doesn t feel heavy, and the two head straps keep the D2 nicely in place, with the only real consequence being bad hair after wearing it for a while. The two lenses are non-spherical, and two sliders at the bottom help adjust focus. Technically, the headset is compatible with the Oculus Rift Development Kit 1 (DK1), but not Kit 2. 3Glasses also has its own SDK (software development kit) available to developers. The headset also comes in two color configurations: black with white trim and all black. A not-so-easy setup It s hard to say if it was specifically because I was using the 3Glasses headset with a Windows 10 gaming laptop, but the setup was an exercise in frustration virtually unmatched by any other product I ve tested. The eponymous Chinese company doesn t include a manual, opting instead to offer step-by-step instructions via a YouTube video and downloadable PowerPoint file. The setup was an exercise in frustration virtually unmatched by any other product I ve tested. While a nice way to help the environment, the footage is out of date with the current website s design, and it focuses on Windows 7 and 8, saying nothing about Windows 10. It hadn t occurred to me that the latest version of Microsoft s operating system would know that the 3Glasses was connected and adjust the second screen accordingly. Or at least I thought so. Initially, there s not a whole lot to the connections. I plugged the HDMI and USB cables into their corresponding ports, and the headset s front logo lit up. On an Alienware 17 R3 laptop, the HDMI port is in the back, while the USB ports are on the sides. The cord on the 3Glasses headset doesn t have a lot of slack when it forks into two, making the plugs awkward to slot in for that particular computer. This may not be the case with most laptops or desktops, but it only added to the bizarre process. I then followed the instructions to download and install 3Linker, the management software designed to handle the headset and content playback. It immediately recognized the 3Glasses D2, and all seemed headed on the right track. The screen orientation was initially out of whack, then with an adjustment in settings on the laptop, it was better, yet now off-centered, forcing me to tilt my eyes up to see the full display through the lenses. It took repeated trial-and-error to get it right, all of which could have probably been alleviated had 3Glasses updated to explain what, if anything, a user should do when using a Windows 10 machine. The software is decent, but 3Glasses, which offers existing games and 360 video on its own site, doesn t populate any into 3Linker after downloading and unpacking them. They each have to be added manually through the Add button or by dragging and dropping them into the app something that wasn t immediately evident during our testing because it only started working the third time we attempted it. Why that happened, we have no idea. Content immersion Finding content to run on the headset is easy enough because 3Glasses has it on its website, though without any standalone apps as of this review. Some are games, while most are video clips that mix picturesque landscapes in China with other miscellaneous footage in 360 degrees or 3D. A couple are a little bizarre, like the Disposing of the Corpse, a morbid scene showing an actor lying in a blood-soaked bathtub, and CouchKnights , an augmented reality scene with a couch and coffee table. Others are nice point-of-view perspectives from a hand glider, go kart racer and slam dunk contest. Ted Kritsonis/Digital Trends Games are fewer in number, with only three really being made available off the bat. The aptly-titled ShooterGame is the most fast-paced as a first-person shooter game, and compatible with an Xbox One controller. Lilith is a puzzle game that also works with the controller, and is a decent opening title to play. Showdown may be the most captivating because of the explosive action and mechanized enemy. Using a keyboard and mouse is another option, in case you don t have a compatible controller. Beyond that, however, content largely has to come from elsewhere and becomes a lesson in what can and can t run on the unit. There is zero compatibility with Macs, game consoles, and Blu-ray players, so everything has to pass through a Windows PC. 3Glasses claims to be working with game developers in China, and up to eight games will be launched by the end of the year. With 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition, you get what you pay for: a cheap system. In the end, there isn t a lot of content to sift through that can work on this headset, unfortunately. Some left/right split-screen 3D games and video should be fine, but I found driver and software issues sometimes messed with how smooth the experience was. Watching 2D content was also unsatisfying for the lack of consistency. At times, the display seemed tilted too far up, while other times, subtitles wouldn t appear. Regular PC games were totally incompatible. Watching a video through Windows Media Player did make it appear on the headset, only with an orientation that was way off. I tried adjusting it through the Windows display settings, but that only made it worse. If there was a foolproof way to get certain content to play without incident, it wasn t evident here. For someone who is interested in VR, but not especially tech-savvy, most of the problems and issues I uncovered would be a total non-starter. The experience from setup to playback is rife with complications that simply don t happen with other VR headsets, including the most acclaimed models. Warranty 3Glasses offers a one-year warranty upon proof of purchase. Full refunds or exchanges are available within 15 days of receiving the headset, so long as it s free of physical defects. For defective or damaged units out of the box, there is a 30-day window to send it back for repair or replacement. Related: We jumped in a VR spacecraft with real copilots and found the social side of VR 5 Note that only the display, motherboard, and plastic headband buckle are fully covered under that one-year warranty. The lenses, fabric headband, padding, and cables are not. Conclusion The DT Accessory Pack Understandably, it s early in the consumer VR space, so what 3Glasses has attempted must be viewed within an early adopter context. The problem is that it doesn t really do what it should: draw in VR newcomers who don t want to break the bank with the HTC Vive or Oculus Rift. Indeed, you do get what you pay for. Those two headsets are more advanced, perform better, and offer a bevy of content already. Had 3Glasses come to market with something like this last year, it might have been the red carpet that showed people the way to what VR offers. Instead, it feels like a rushed product that sits in no-man s land. With Google s recent unveiling of its Daydream VR standard 6 , along with the expectation that Samsung and other major manufacturers are prepping new VR headsets, it s hard to recommend the 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition. References ^ 3Glasses D2 Vanguard Edition (the3glasses.com) ^ HTC Vive (www.digitaltrends.com) ^ Oculus Rift (www.digitaltrends.com) ^ Google s Daydream could be the Gear VR s worst nightmare (www.digitaltrends.com) ^ We jumped in a VR spacecraft with real copilots and found the social side of VR (www.digitaltrends.com) ^ its Daydream VR standard (www.digitaltrends.com)
  • 4

  • 4-Ounce Wireless Server Streams 2TB, Even Underwater Laptops 1 Tablets 2 Windows 10 3 Ultrabooks 4 Accessories 5 Reviews 6 News 7 Follow Us: SEARCH Laptops 8 Tablets 9 Windows 10 10 Ultrabooks 11 Accessories 12 Reviews 13 News 14 Best Laptops 15 Best Tablets 16 Best 2-in-1s 17 Laptops for College 18 Best SSDs 19 Laptops By Brand Acer 21 Apple 22 ASUS 23 Dell 24 HP Lenovo 25 MSI 26 Samsung 27 Toshiba 28 20 Laptop Configurator 29 By Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director | January 7, 2016 01:30 pm 30 MORE References ^ Laptops (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Tablets (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Windows 10 (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Ultrabooks (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Accessories (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Reviews (www.laptopmag.com) ^ News (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Laptops (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Tablets (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Windows 10 (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Ultrabooks (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Accessories (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Reviews (www.laptopmag.com) ^ News (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best Laptops (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best Tablets (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best 2-in-1s (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Laptops for College (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best SSDs (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Laptops By Brand (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Acer (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Apple (www.laptopmag.com) ^ ASUS (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Dell (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Lenovo (www.laptopmag.com) ^ MSI (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Samsung (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Toshiba (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Laptop Configurator (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director (plus.google.com)
  • 4GB RAM Memory for IBM-Lenovo ThinkPad X201 (All Types) (DDR3-10600) - Laptop Memory Upgrade - Bargain Discount
  • 5

  • 5 Key Takeaways from Microsoft Build Microsoft's Build conference is nearly entirely aimed at developers. But that's not to say that this year's Build came and went without any announcements that directly benefit end users like you and me. For example, an update to Windows 10 will offer greatly enhanced pen capabilities, Cortana is getting a lot smarter and bots are going to be at your beck and call. Here are five key announcements from the Build keynote that you need to know about. 1. Better Inking Microsoft's digital drawing and writing tools are getting expanded powers in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update 1 slated for this summer. Jot down a time in a sticky note, and that time becomes tappable so that you can set up a reminder with the Cortana assistant. Draw a line between two points on a map, and you'll not only get a calculation of the distance, but directions between the two points as well. And, in a feature that put a song in my cold editor's heart, you can use a stylus to cross out entire paragraphs in a Word document, and all that text will get deleted. Microsoft's Ink demo came out a week after Apple took the wraps off a 9.7-inch version of the iPad Pro 2 , touting that tablet's sketching capabilities when you spring for the £99 Apple Pencil accessory. I'm not suggesting today's Ink announcement is a direct response to that Microsoft has clearly been working on these new Ink features for a while but it's fascinating to see both Microsoft and Apple emphasize all the tools at our disposal when we use these devices to draw. 2. Microsoft Wants to Get More Apps Running on its Devices You could be forgiven for tuning out when Microsoft went deep on all the developer tools for creating apps in Windows. (The person seated in front of me in the press section started reading news headlines about the 2016 election.) But know that Microsoft is doing all that it can to get more apps on its platform. For starters, Microsoft is adding support for Bash, the Linux command line, aimed at bringing more developers into the fold. If you've got a Win32 or .NET app lying around, Microsoft built a Desktop App Converter tool that can turn those offerings into modern desktop apps that can appear on the Windows App Store. For game makers, Microsoft's adding tools that can convert a retail Xbox One console into a development kit. "There really has been no better time to be a Windows developer," Microsoft executive vice president Terry Myerson said during today's keynote. Microsoft's betting that it'll be an even better time for Windows users should these developer tools bear fruit. MORE: Windows 10: Full Review 3 3. Skype and Cortana Are Becoming Best Friends Generally, I use Skype 4 only when people insist upon connecting with me there. But I'm willing to rethink that policy now that Microsoft's adding integration with its Cortana personal assistant. As demoed during the Build keynote, the forthcoming Skype update will let you book travel from within the app, serve up hyperlinks with information relevant to your conversation, and mark off appointments in your calendar. I particularly liked Skype's visual videomail feature, not because I necessarily crave video messages from friends and co-workers but because a transcript of the message appears right below it. That's potentially a real time-saver. 4. Meet the Bots Given Microsoft's recent track record with bots 5 , you might have have thought the company would be little gun-shy about giving artificial intelligence any stage time at Build. But bots which can carry on conversations with you with an eye toward carrying out tasks and fielding requests are a major part of what Microsoft's working on, and you'll be interacting with them sooner rather than later. Making hotel reservations through Skype, for example, will put you in contact with bots. In an on-stage demo, a bot from the Westin hotel chain took care of booking a room. For now, Microsoft is focusing on bringing bots to messaging in Skype, but eventually it wants to add them to audio and video calls as well. You can experience the bold bot future yourself. Microsoft released updates of Skype for Windows, Android, and iOS that feature preview bots you can interact with. 5. Apps Are Getting More Human embedded content It's still a developer tool at this point, but Microsoft's Cognitive Services figure to dramatically expand what the apps you use are capable of doing. Microsoft has released 22 APIs capable of detecting faces and speech while tapping into knowledge databases and web searches. App makers will be able to build these tools into their apps, with the goal of providing more contextual uses. Microsoft showed a hint at last year's Build with a demo of its How Old Are You 6 tool a website that guessed your age (often incorrectly) just by looking at a picture. Microsoft's made significant progress in the past year, though, if the last demo of this year's Build keynote is anything to go by. It featured Saqib Shaikh, a blind Microsoft software engineer, who developed an AI-assisted app running on a headset that can describe everything from people's expressions to any objects in view. The demo got the most enthusiastic reaction of the day, not just because it's a moving story, but also because it shows just how apps can be created that improve our daily lives. Recommended by References ^ Windows 10 Anniversary Update (www.laptopmag.com) ^ 9.7-inch version of the iPad Pro (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Windows 10: Full Review (www.laptopmag.com) ^ use Skype (www.laptopmag.com) ^ recent track record with bots (www.tomsguide.com) ^ How Old Are You (www.tomsguide.com)
  • 5 Ways Microsoft Can Promote Windows 10 Without Fooling Users Come on, Microsoft! There are so many great reasons for people to upgrade to Windows 10. But when the company resorts to deception and UI trickery 1 in an effort to get users to install the new OS, it undermines all of its arguments. This week, several Windows 7 and 8 users noticed that, when they clicked the Close button on a Windows 10 upgrade alert, the new operating system installed anyway. Microsoft considers the unwanted installations a "feature," not a bug, the company confirmed in a statement 2 to Windows Expert Paul Thurrott this week. Closing the notification window only signifies to Microsoft that you want to hide the alert, not that you want to avoid the upgrade. It's easy to understand why Microsoft is eager to get users onto Windows 10. The new flagship operating system does more than just provide new features and enhanced performance; it enables the current Windows Store and an ecosystem of "universal apps." The cut of revenue Microsoft gets from selling these mostly third-party apps to users could be huge. Apple's share of its App Store sales netted that company £6 billion in 2015 alone. Windows 10 also collects some valuable but anonymized data from users that Microsoft can use for advertisements. Unfortunately, forcing an upgrade on unsuspecting users will not lead to a lot of Windows 10 fans. So here's my advice. These are five ways Microsoft should promote Windows 10, without fooling people. 1. Extend the July 29th free-upgrade deadline. Microsoft recently reiterated that it plans to stop offering free Windows 10 upgrades after July 29, the operating system's one-year anniversary. After that date, Windows 7 and 8 users who want to install the upgrade will have to pay at least £119 (for Windows 10 Home). This hard deadline for upgrading makes little sense. If you really want people to upgrade and they didn't do it for free in the first 12 months, why on earth would they pay £119 thereafter? Perhaps Microsoft believes that setting an end point and sticking with it will encourage procrastinators to take the leap, but what about those who don't? A recent Computerworld article 3 theorizes that Microsoft has to stick with its deadline because the free upgrades are suppressing PC sales from consumers who will now buy new computers with the OS preloaded. But again, if someone wouldn't upgrade their laptop to Windows 10 for free, why would they pay extra in this case, more than a hundred dollars extra just to get it? PC sales are shrinking for a lot of reasons, but a free Windows 10 upgrade isn't one of them. 2. Lower manufacturer licensing fees across the board. One reason for the decline in PC sales is the high cost of upgrade-worthy hardware 4 . Nobody wants to buy a £500 laptop, because most of today's £500 laptops aren't significantly better than consumers' still-working models from 2011. Along with the cost of components such as the CPU and RAM, every PC vendor has to pay Microsoft licensing fees to install Windows on their computers. The amount that major manufacturers like Dell and Lenovo pay per license is a well-guarded secret, but it definitely adds to the overall price of their products. A couple of years ago, Microsoft started offering manufacturers free Windows on the company's cheapest devices, in order to compete with Chromebooks. And, lo and behold, the sub-£300 laptop market is booming, with a growth rate of 19 percent year over year in the first quarter, according to NPD Group. However, to qualify for free Windows, laptops have to have the worst specs possible. The specs aren't public, but we've heard from reliable sources that devices don't qualify for free Windows if they have more than 2GB of RAM. If Microsoft included more-robust laptops in its free Windows program and cut the licensing fees it charges manufacturers for other systems, the price of PCs would drop accordingly. Sales of Windows 10 computers would increase, and so would the user base of app-purchasing consumers. 3. Stop punishing system builders. While we don't know what manufacturers like Dell pay to put Windows on their computers, we can imagine that it is far less than the £119 Microsoft charges consumers for Windows 10 Home. So, if you buy a "bare-bones" computer, such as the Intel NUC, or you build your own PC from scratch, you need to add £119 to the cost. That's a huge disincentive for people to buy those products, and it further suppresses computer sales and the user base. If the company is willing to sell Acer a Windows 10 license for £50 (just throwing out a guess here), it should charge you the same amount when you buy a mini PC and have to install your own OS. 4. Offer Windows Store credit. How about incentivizing users to upgrade, rather than trying to fool them? For some people, the increased performance and functionality of Windows 10 are good enough reasons to upgrade, but that's not the case for everyone. How about offering consumers £10 or £20 of credit to use for apps in the Windows store? That may sound like a huge and expensive giveaway, but it's also a great way to get consumers accustomed to buying apps in Windows 10, which is the ultimate reward for Microsoft. 5. Add killer first-party apps. Like Microsoft's previous operating systems, Windows 10 comes with plenty of first-party apps preloaded, but unfortunately, those apps are not particularly compelling. The built-in email software pales in comparison to web-based tools such as Gmail, and the News (sports and finance) apps provide no real advantages over just visiting the Bing website or another news source. Microsoft needs to take a page from Apple's book and include really strong built-in programs. It desperately needs a good Windows 10 video editor that's comparable to Apple's iMovie. (Windows Live Movie Maker is still available as a download, but it hasn't been updated in years.) It should provide a friendly backup tool that's on a par with Time Machine and a preloaded audio editor that's half as good as GarageBand. It would even help Microsoft's case if the company made the full version of Solitaire free, when now you have to pay to unlock all of its features. Bottom Line Yes, all of my proposals involve Microsoft giving up some money, either in terms of licensing fees, incentives or app development. However, if Microsoft really wants users to upgrade, it has to invest in its ecosystem for the long term. In 2016, Microsoft is the only major software vendor that charges money for its operating system. Mac users get free upgrades to the latest version of OS X every year, while iPhone and iPad owners get the latest iOS without a fee. Google doesn't charge device makers a fee for Android or Chrome OS. Ubuntu and the other leading Linux systems have always been free. These other companies see the value of building their user bases over turning a direct profit on the OS. Windows 10 is worth paying for, but if Microsoft wants to grow its ecosystem, get people to use its app store and encourage developers to build universal apps, it needs to give users more incentives to upgrade. Top image credit: Shutterstock / Antonio Guillem Windows 10 Basics Windows 10 Basics Recommended by Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director The official Geeks Geek, as his weekly column is titled, Avram Piltch has guided the editorial and production of Laptopmag.com since 2007. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram programmed several of LAPTOP's real-world benchmarks, including the LAPTOP Battery Test. He holds a master s degree in English from NYU. Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director on References ^ deception and UI trickery (www.laptopmag.com) ^ confirmed in a statement (www.thurrott.com) ^ Computerworld article (www.computerworld.com) ^ high cost of upgrade-worthy hardware (www.laptopmag.com)
  • 6

  • 65W 20V AC Adapter Charger Power Supply & UK Mains Power Cable for Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13-2191 IdeaPad Yoga 13 Official / IdeaPad Yoga 13 Ultrabook 45N0261/0C19868 IdeaPad Yoga 13/ Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 3448 / X1 Carbon Win 8 3444 / X1 Carbon Win 8 3460 / PA-1900-72 ADLX90NCC3A /45N0245 45N0246 45N0236 /X1 Helix S3 S5 -LENOGE®
  • 65W Charger for Lenovo Thinkpad B450 B460 K23 K46 R400 R500 T400 T410 T420 T420S T430 T430S T500 T510 T520 T530 L520 L530 X121E X200 X201 X220 X230 X300 X301 - Original Lavolta Laptop AC Adapter Notebook Power Supply - fits 42T4417 42T5283 40Y7704 40Y7696 - with UK Power Cord and Cable Holder
  • 65W Genuine AJP Brand Charger Laptop AC Adapter for Lenovo B40, B50, B50-30, B50-45, B50-70, G40, G50, G50-30, G50-45, G50-70, G50-70m, N20, N20P, N40, N50, Z40, Z50, Z50-70 Series Notebook Adaptor Power Supply Cord Plug - 20V 3.25A - Cut Price
  • 65W Laptop Car Adapter Charger for IBM Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga13, Yoga 2 Pro, IdeaPad Flex 14, ADLX65NDC2A ADLX65NLC3A, Lenovo Yoga Serie 11 11s 13, ThinkPad X1 Helix S3 S5-Serie, ThinkPad X1 Carbon-3448-Serie 20V 3.25A - Cut Price
  • 65W Lavolta® AC Adapter Laptop Charger for Lenovo Thinkpad L420 L421 L520 SL400C SL410 SL500C T410 T420 T420i T420s T430 T520 T530 X100e X131e X220 X230 X230i; Lenovo Thinkpad Edge 11 13 E10 E31 E220 E220s E335 E420 E420s E430 E435 E520 E530 E530c E535; Lenovo Ideapad U165 U455 U460 U460s; Levono 3000 B450 B460E C100 C200 C205 N100 N105 N200 V100 V200 Y100 Y200 Z560 Notebook Series Power Supply Cord Plug - 20V 3.25A, fits 42T5283, 42T4417, 42T4421, 42T4425, 42T4429, 40Y7659, 40Y7663, 40Y7667 - Mega Price
  • 65W Original Lavolta AC Adapter Laptop Charger for Lenovo ThinkPad Edge E130 E335 E430 E435 E530 E530c E535; ThinkPad X131e X230i, X230 Tablet, T430i T430u T430s T530 Notebook Power Supply Plug Cord - 20V 3.25A- with UK Power Cord and 24 Months Warranty
  • 7

  • 7 Computer Pranks That Will Drive Your Friends Crazy Most people would hate it if someone messed with their laptop. It's an expensive productivity tool, and someone screwing around with it could cost time, work or even hundreds of dollars. But if you've got a rebellious streak (or a grudge), there are ways to escalate your interoffice prank war by changing a few settings on someone else's computer. Just remember, if you can do it to them, they may be able to do it to you, too. DISCLAIMER: Try these at your own risk. They're fun if your friends and co-workers have a sense of humor, but they can also get you fired for messing with company hardware. Don't be a jerk, and pick your victims very carefully. Here are some of our favorite PC pranks. Fake Desktop You can make a computer seem like it is perpetually frozen. Take a screenshot of someone's desktop, shortcuts and all. Set it as the wallpaper, and then remove the existing shortcuts and hide the menu bar. When the person on the receiving end of the prank gets back to the computer, they'll be clicking at nothing in frustration. Set the Screen Saver to the Blue Screen of Death Nothing is worse than thinking your computer is completely done for, and Windows' Blue Screen of Death is the biggest symbol of that dread. If you want to get a co-worker's heart racing, you can change his or her screensaver to the BSOD. When they come back, they'll think their computer is gone for good . . . until they try moving their mouse. Rotate the Display Rotating someone's display is quick and easy to execute (and just as easy to fix). On Windows, pressing Alt + Ctrl and the arrow keys flips the screen to any orientation you choose, such as turning your victim's screen upside down. If the computer is connected to a DisplayLink dock, those monitors won't be affected, so this is best done on singular screens or laptops. On Macs, you have to go to System Preferences > Displays to pick a new display orientation. Switch Out Dongles for Mice and Keyboards If your office uses wireless mice and keyboards with USB dongles, you can move the receivers around to cause a little mayhem. You'll cackle in your seat as co-workers around you wonder why their mouse is moving on its own, or how someone else's emails are composing themselves on their computers. Invert Colors Another quick-and-dirty scheme, inverting the colors, enables an accessibility feature few people know about. Enabling a computer's high-contrast mode shows white or yellow text on a black background in programs and on the desktop. Make sure you install a high-contrast theme 1 in Chrome as well, if your victim uses Google's browser. On Windows, use the shortcut Shift + Alt + Print Screen to activate it. On Mac, go to System Preferences > Accessibility > Display > Invert colors. "Broken" Monitor A quick change of wallpaper can mess with your co-workers and friends. Pick a wallpaper that looks like the screen 2 is cracked or on the fritz. Prepare for a minor freak-out. Change the Mouse Pointer When you see an icon next to your mouse, you assume that something's going on in the background. What if it never stopped? What if a reboot didn't get rid of it? You can make the mouse pointer look perpetually busy. In Windows, go to Control Panel, Appearance and Personalization > Personalization > Change mouse pointers to see your options. We recommend "busy" or "working in background." Laptop Guide Laptop Guide Recommended by Andrew E. Freedman, Andrew joined Laptopmag.com in 2015, reviewing computers and keeping up with the latest news. He holds a M.S. in Journalism (Digital Media) from Columbia University. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Kotaku, PCMag and Complex, among others. Follow him on Twitter @FreedmanAE. Andrew E. Freedman, on References ^ a high-contrast theme (chrome.google.com) ^ a wallpaper that looks like the screen (www.google.com)
  • 9

  • 9-Cell 11.1V 7800mAh Replacement Laptop Battery for IBM Lenovo ThinkPad E40 E50 Sl410 Sl510 T410 T510 W510 ASM 42T4756 Bay Valley Parts®
  • 9.7-inch iPad Pro vs. the Competition Looking to give even more options to power users, Apple has unveiled a 9.7-inch version of the iPad Pro. Offering many of the same powerful specs as its 12.9-inch counterpart, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is targeting iPad fans looking to upgrade their slates as well as shoppers looking to purchase their first tablet. But does this latest iPad Pro do enough to stand out from the competition? Design Apple is the master of making barely-there products and the new iPad Pro is no exception. Measuring 9.4 x 6.6 x 0.24 inches and weighing 0.96 pounds, it makes the Samsung Galaxy TabPro S (1.5 pounds, 11.4 x 7.8 x 0.25 inches) and the Lenovo Yoga Tab 3 Pro 1 (1.5 pounds, 9.7 x 7.1 x 0.18 inches) seem chunky by comparison. Clad in aluminum with its familiar rounded corners, the iPad Pro practically screams premium, especially in Rose Gold, the newest color in Apple's growing palette. Display Just because the tablet is smaller, don't expect a loss of quality. The new Pro rocks a 9.7 inch, 2048 x 1536 resolution Retina display just like the iPad Air 2. And if the Air 2's display is any indication, consumers will be enjoying rich color, including deep blacks and vibrant reds with crisp details and impressive brightness. But Apple improved upon the formula, adding a True Tone display, which automatically adjusts the screen's white balance based on the light in the room in an attempt to eliminate eye strain and make reading text easier overall. The company also claims this new panel is 25 percent brighter than the Air 2 and 40 percent less reflective and uses the same color gamut as the iMac Retina 5K panel. MORE: Best 2-in-1s (Laptop/Tablet Hybrids) 2 Performance Similar to its larger cousin, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro is being touted as a PC killer thanks to its A9X chip with 64-bit architecture and M9 coprocessor. If it's anything like the 12.9-inch version, the smaller Pro will have the ability to edit 4K video clips and other laptop-esque feats. However, it will fall short of matching the power of most ultraportable machines. It's a still a safe bet that the 9.7 Pro will give most tablets a run for their money performance-wise. But I'm eager to see how it fares against the TabPro S' 2.2-GHz Intel Core M processor. Special Features Siri and the security-focused Touch ID will be making an appearance on the iPad Pro. But the real star of the show might be the 12-megapixel iSight camera, which can capture 4K video as well as slow-motion video at 240 fps. It will also create Live Photos, Apple's stylish take on GIFs. The competition, however, refuses to be outdone. When the TabPro S launches, you'll have the ability to unlock the slate with your Galaxy smartphone as well as check and respond to messages from your phone in Windows 10. The Yoga Tab Pro 3 has a built-in projector, which can come in handy during presentations or if you want to watch a movie. Storage Apple continues to tax consumers pretty heavily for storage space. The entry-level 32GB iPad Pro is priced at £599, while the Yoga Tab 3 Pro and the Google Pixel C 3 are charging £100 less. But the £749 128GB version of the tablet is cheaper than the TabPro S (£899, 128GB). Those of us with a seemingly endless amount of apps, games, photos, videos and music will be happy to know that the iPad Pro will be available in an £899 256GB SKU, which is a first for any iPad. MORE: 10 Tablets with the Longest Battery Life 4 Battery Life Thanks to its 27.5 watt-hour lithium-polymer battery, iPad Pro should last up to 10 hours, which puts it on a par with the Air 2, which clocked 9 hours and 20 minutes during the Laptop Mag Battery Test. That'll definitely get you through a regular work or school day, but its no match for the Yoga Tab Pro 3 or the Pixel C, which hit 10:35 and 11:08 respectively. Accessories It just wouldn't be a "laptop-killer" without the Smart Keyboard (£149) and the Pencil (£99). When we tested the Smart Keyboard on the original iPad Pro, we liked the overall feel of the water-resistant dock. We were also fond of the shortcuts Apple had the wherewithal to include. However, we missed the backlighting featured on Surface Pro's smart cover as well as having a touchpad and buttons for volume. We weren't that impressed with the TabPro S' keyboard during our hands-on due to lack of backlighting and a cramped typing experience, though the keyboard is at least included. The Pixel C, on the other hand, delivered solid typing despite its smaller keys. We found the Apple Pencil to provide a comfortable drawing experience, thanks to its reliable palm-rejection, low latency and ability to adjust line width by the amount of pressure placed on the pen. It's worth noting, however, that the Lenovo Yoga Tab 3 Pro lets you use just about any conducive object as a stylus thanks to the slate's AnyPen technology. Samsung's stylus for the TabPro will cost extra, though we don't yet know how much. Bottom Line The new iPad Pro takes everything we liked about the original and places it in a lighter, more portable chassis. We appreciate the 256GB storage option, but wish Apple could find a way to be a little more budget- friendly, especially since you still have pay up for the Smart Keyboard and Pencil. Overall though, it looks like the latest iPad will be the tablet to beat when it hits shelves on March 31. Recommended by References ^ Lenovo Yoga Tab 3 Pro (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Best 2-in-1s (Laptop/Tablet Hybrids) (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Google Pixel C (www.laptopmag.com) ^ 10 Tablets with the Longest Battery Life (www.laptopmag.com)
  • 90W Charger for Lenovo Thinkpad Edge 14 15 S430 E120 E125 E130 E135 E320 E325 E330 E335 E420 E425 E430 E435 E520 E525 E530 E535 E10 E30 E31 E40 E49 E50 Laptop - Original Lavolta Notebook AC Adapter Power Supply Plug Cord - 20V 4.5A - Special
  • 90W FOR IBM-LENOVO THINKPAD L420 782748U LAPTOP AC ADAPTER CHARGER 20V 4.5A POWER SUPPLY PSU REPLACEMENT
  • 90W Laptop Charger AC Adapter Power for IBM Lenovo ThinkPad e40 T410 T420 T510 T60 T400 20V 4.5A 7.9mm*5.5mm 12 month warranty Bay Valley Parts® - Cut Rate
  • 90W Lavolta® Charger Laptop AC Adapter for Lenovo Ideapad S210, S215, U330, U330p, U330t, U430, U430p, U530, Z410, Z510, Z710; Thinkpad L440, L540, T440, T440p, T440s, T540p; Essential G500, G505s, G510, G700, G710; Lenovo B5400, G400, G500, G505, G510; Lenovo G400s, G405s, G500s, G505s Touch Notebook Adaptor Power Supply Plug Cord - 20V 4.5A, fits Delta ADLX90NDC3A, 36200250; Liteon ADLX90NLC3A, 36200252; Chicony ADLX90NCC3A, 36200254
  • 90W Lavolta® Charger Laptop AC Adapter for Lenovo Thinkpad L420 L430 L530 T400 T400s T410 T410i T410s T410si T420 T420s T430 T430i T430s T430u T430si T500 T510 T510i T520 T530 T530i X200 X200s X200t X220 X220i X230 X230t X300 / Thinkpad Edge E145 E420 E420s E425 E430 E430c E525 E530 E535 E545 / Twist S230u Notebook Ultrabook Tablet Series Power Supply Cord Plug - 20V 4.5A - with UK Power Cord and 24 Months Warrany
  • 90W Lavolta® In-Car Charger Laptop DC Adapter for Lenovo Thinkpad L420 L430 L530 T400 T400s T410 T410i T410s T410si T420 T420s T430 T430i T430s T430u T430si T500 T510 T510i T520 T530 T530i X200 X200s X200t X220 X220i X230 X230t X300 / Thinkpad Edge E145 E420 E420s E425 E430 E430c E525 E530 E535 E545 / Twist S230u Notebook Ultrabook Travel Power Supply Cord Plug - Special Price
  • A

  • A Closer Look at Alcatel's Huge Xess Kitchen Tablet The Alcatel Xess is a tablet 1 fit for a giant. First unveiled at IFA 2 in the fall, this huge, 17.3-inch slate will now go on sale starting April 22. But unlike the similarly hefty Samsung Galaxy View 3 or even the iPad Pro 4 , the Xess is not meant for multimedia consumption. Think of it as a smart home accessory with a focus on the kitchen. The Android-based Xess stands up on a kickstand and it's relatively portable thanks to a handle, but it's intended to live on your kitchen counter. If you feel the need to move it around, though, it's heavy but sturdy and easy to carry. We didn't test the battery life, but it should last a full day unplugged, Alcatel says. The tablet has two modes: Google Mode, which is essentially stock Android, and Xess Mode, which is intended to be the device's main home screen. Basically, Xess Mode features four large widgets: one for the calendar, lists, and settings; a weather widget; a shopping and recipe widget; and one with apps. Tap the recipes button, and the widget in the middle will go to something called Kitchen Stories, while the recipes button you just pressed becomes an Amazon shopping list. Switch between the two as you decide what you need to buy. The widget on the far right is the most flexible; it's where you can put apps like YouTube and Nickelodeon. If you swipe left on the right side of the screen, you get access to messaging apps like Gmail and Facebook Messenger 5 . At the bottom of the screen are your home and back buttons, along with an app tray button on the far right, where you can access downloaded apps. All these widgets and apps can be taxing on a processor, and we found that to be the case when trying the Xess. The Alcatel tablet runs a Mediatek MT6573 processor and 3GB of RAM, with 32GB of internal storage. Mediatek processors are usually found on lower-end Android tablets, and although Alcatel assures us that the finished product will be much faster, switching between apps and loading pages were somewhat sluggish during our hands on. The Xess sports a 1,920-by-1,080 display, which is good enough to enjoy Netflix 6 at the dinner table; not incredibly crisp, but serviceable. Alcatel will package an IP camera with the tablet, so if you're making dinner and want to keep an eye on your little one, select the camera widget. The stream of the camera is a little delayed on the Xess, but that's to be expected. Other notable hardware features include two USB 2.0 ports on the back, and a microSD slot that supports an extra 32GB of storage. At £499, it's a hard sell for anyone who isn't an early adopter. Although there is a clear Internet of Things (IoT) market to be tapped by home hubs especially ones for the kitchen many people just aren't that into tablets anymore. It's possible that the Xess could help revitalize the market by rebranding tablets as something you use as part of a daily routine, but we'll have to wait and see. References ^ tablet (uk.pcmag.com) ^ unveiled at IFA (uk.pcmag.com) ^ Samsung Galaxy View (uk.pcmag.com) ^ iPad Pro (uk.pcmag.com) ^ Facebook Messenger (uk.pcmag.com) ^ Netflix (uk.pcmag.com)
  • A First Look at Lenovo Yoga 900: A Stylish, Powerful And Flexible Notebook Lenovo today pulled the wraps off its latest Yoga Tab 3 Pro and Yoga 900 Convertible in India. Initially, the Yoga Tab 3 Pro was unveiled at the IFA trade show last year, while the Yoga 900 Convertible is the successor of Yoga 900. The Yoga 900 is Lenovo's top-of-the-line device offering a high-resolution touchscreen, powerful 6th generation Core i7 processor, a faster SSD storage and a large battery, among others, all tucked inside a thin and light body. Powerful | Stylish | Lightweight On a first glance, the Yoga 900 is one of the best convertibles you can get these days. We spent some time with the Yoga 900 today and here is our first impressions. Design And Built On the very first look, the Lenovo Yoga 900 is a close replica of Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro, which was launched last year, with similar design lines and the same watchband hings holding the screen and the lower body together. However, once you start using the Yoga 900, you will notice there are quite a few things setting this notebook apart from the Yoga 3 Pro. When it comes to built quality, the Yoga 900 is well built and feels comfortable to hold in your hands. The exterior is metallic and available in three different colors: Clementine Orange, Champagne Gold, and Platinum Silver. The watchband keeps the screen sturdily in place and allows for smooth transition between the four different modes you can use Yoga 900 in: Notebook, Stand, Tent and Tablet. Lenovo says it has been redesigned from the older model. The hinge is composed of 813 individual components for fluid transitions between modes, but with minimal gaps between moving parts, for consistent tension. Auto Lock hinge technology allows you to easily open and close the laptop, even with one hand. On the right side, there is the DC-IN port that also acts as a USB 2.0 slot, a USB 3.0 slot, the card-reader and USB Type-C port. While, on the other side it has the headphone/microphone jack, a Screen Lock, the OneKey Recovery and the Power buttons. Starting at a mere 1.29 kg and just 14.9 mm thick, the Yoga 900 is ultraportable and the company claims it is the world's thinnest Intel Core i convertible. Overall, the Yoga 900 is not a majorly redesigned notebook, but Lenovo sure tweaked a few aspects of the newer model, considering the exterior design, internal layout and I/O on the sides. Screen, Keyboard And Trackpad The Yoga 900 sports a 13.3-inch IPS Multi-Touch Glossy type White LED panel display with a resolution of 3200x1800 pixels. With IPS LCD displays with high brightness. IPS technology allows for vivid colors and nearly 180-degree viewing angles. The QHD+ display looks great from any angle. The keyboard sits higher on the frame, which makes larger room for palm-rest. The keys have been slightly revamped from the Yoga 3 Pro, as the two-tone design has been replaced with a simpler solid-black. The keyboard types well, but for the first time use, we felt its flat and mushy. Well, moving on to the trackpad, it is a Synaptics Surface with a size of 90x60 mm, but is not certified as a Windows Precision Touchpad. Hardware And Operating System The Yoga 900 is bundled with 6th generation Intel Core i7 processor and 8G LPDDRIII1600 RAM onboard. The family with built-in security is ready to take your productivity, creativity, and 3D gaming to the next level. The faster CPUs help with boot-up times, loading times and especially with everyday multitasking and some demanding chores. Further, the laptop is shipped with Windows 10 Home, Integrated Graphics, 512G NGFF SSD for storage and 720P HD camera. We found the device fast while using it for a limited time period, we will provide the full performance report in our full review. Battery Life The Lenovo Yoga 900 bundles a 66 Wh battery, larger than any of the other premium 13-inchers have to offer these days. According to the company, the Yoga 900 lets you go all day without recharging thanks to a battery that delivers up to 9 hours local video playback. Price And Availability The Lenovo Yoga 900 is available in Croma stores, selected Lenovo Exclusive Stores and official Lenovo online store for Rs. 1,22,090. Early Verdict Lenovo has done a great job with this Yoga 900 and majorly improved their previous Yoga 3 Pro. In fact, it is a proper alternative to the HP Spectre x360, a device that reigned unchallenged in the premium 13-inch convertibles segment. In comparison, the Yoga 900 is thinner, lighter and packs a larger 66 Wh battery, compared to the 55 Wh one of the HP. However, we will provide our full verdict of this notebook in our full review, stay tuned. Stay tuned to GizBot for more updates!
  • A Future Without Windows Is a Dystopian Nightmare I had a nightmare last night. In it, my company hired a new head of IT, who decided to "lock down" all of our computers so that we couldn't install software or change any settings or even the wallpaper, which was filled with company logos. Many companies operate with policies like this, because they don't trust their employees and thus treat them like children. As for actual children, schools have found the perfect locked-down computer for them: the Chromebook. This week, we found out that Chromebooks are outselling Macs (but still not Windows PCs) for the first time. Already, Chromebooks account for more than 50 percent of the K-12 market. My colleague, Mark Spoonauer, says these stats show that Chrome OS is the future 1 and Windows is the past. I hope he's wrong, because he's envisioning a dystopian future where there are two kinds of people: those who consume and those who create. Imagine a future where there are two very distinct classes of people: builders and users. Although you can change their desktop wallpaper, today's Chromebooks are the very definition of locked boxes. You can install a few sandboxed apps, most of which are web pages, and you can surf the web. That's a good scenario for parents and school administrators, because they don't want children installing viruses, piling on pirated software or using age-inappropriate apps. School IT managers can add content filters to their networks so kids aren't able to visit the wrong websites. MORE: Why We're Heading Toward a Windows-Less World 2 The problem with Chrome OS (and Android) machines is that they're not good for coding or creating content of any kind. The people who actually build the sites and software you use on a Chromebook or an Android tablet are using Windows, Linux or Mac OS computers to do their work. You can post to social media or do a webcast from Chrome OS, but if you want to do "real" media editing, you need a real computer. Even a £200 Windows 10 laptop can run basic development tools such as Visual Studio Express or simple video editors like Windows Movie Maker. We learned this week that Google will soon provide a way to load Android apps on to Chromebooks, which will make them much more versatile. But that still won't turn them into content-creation systems. The major development and content-creation tools don't run on Android, and with their tiny storage drives and slow CPUs, Chromebooks aren't meant for coding, rendering 3D models or editing large videos. And if Google ever beefed up its laptops' hardware to appeal to content creators, they'd stop being simple and idiot-proof the very reasons schools buy them today. Do you want to live in a future where only a few people with "open PCs" have the ability to change the world In his column, Mark says, "At some point, today's kids may 'graduate' to a Windows machine, but when you grow up with Chrome OS and it's easy and familiar, there might not be much incentive to switch." MORE: Should You Buy a Chromebook? 3 Imagine a future where the world is divided between builders and users. Builders create the applications and content that users consume. Today, we live in a world where most people are users, even if they have Windows or Mac OS. But at least with those desktop platforms, there's the opportunity to take the reins and start coding an app, building your own website from scratch or installing software that's not been endlessly sandboxed and prescreened for you. With Chrome OS, you're a passive player who cannot take full control of your device or your experience. Sure, having a stripped-down platform is always going to be easier than having choices. A simple toaster with a single plunger button will always be easier to use than a toaster oven with dials on it. But do you want to live in a future where only a few people with "open PCs" have the ability to change the world, while the rest of us just live in it? Image Credit: Shutterstock / Vladimir Gjorgiev Laptop Guide Laptop Guide Recommended by Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director The official Geeks Geek, as his weekly column is titled, Avram Piltch has guided the editorial and production of Laptopmag.com since 2007. With his technical knowledge and passion for testing, Avram programmed several of LAPTOP's real-world benchmarks, including the LAPTOP Battery Test. He holds a master s degree in English from NYU. Avram Piltch, LAPTOP Online Editorial Director on References ^ Chrome OS is the future (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Why We're Heading Toward a Windows-Less World (www.laptopmag.com) ^ Should You Buy a Chromebook? (www.laptopmag.com)
  • A gaming laptop that keeps its cool "Why do all these gaming laptops look like sneakers?" That was the question my wife -- herself no stranger to gaming -- asked when I lifted the lid on the latest version of Acer's 15-inch Predator laptop. It may seem like an odd question for ask about a computer, but I immediately understood the point. Where most mainstream laptops go for understated minimalism, and indeed try their best to fade into the background, gaming laptops (and desktops) are invariably covered with accented bling. There can be menacing red lights, textured interior surfaces that look like the bed of a pickup truck, plastic vents with shark-like fins. It's all part of a visual language that attempts to communicate the power and capability of the interior components, which are invisible to the naked eye. Even the Razer Blade 1 line of laptops 2 , arguably the least gaudy of gaming systems, have that company's neon green logo of conjoined snakes 3 on the back, and a pulsing multicolor lightshow under the keyboard. Sarah Tew/CNET Yes, the Acer Predator 15 follows many of those gaming laptop tropes, but I actually liked some parts of its design. At the very least, it's gaudy in its own way, and doesn't directly copy the look of other gaming laptops too closely. I especially liked red keyshafts on the arrow keys and WASD keys (especially important keys for PC gaming). There's also a pleasingly consistent design sense from the red speakers on the front edge through to the red border around the giant air vent in on the rear edge. Dorm-friendly design aside, the most notable thing about the Predator 15 is that this is a rare opportunity to get a high-end Nvidia 980M gaming graphics card in a smaller 15-inch laptop. Typically, we see the 970M and 980M cards in larger 17-inch laptops, while smaller 15-inch gaming laptops usually get stuck with the mainstream-level Nvidia 960M graphics card, which is no slouch, but isn't what serious game-players are looking for. However, keep in mind that this laptop is on the larger side of the 15-inch spectrum. You can place it next to a 17-inch gaming laptop and the size difference is not going to be as dramatic as, for example, a slim 15-inch HP Omen 4 versus a typical 17-inch gaming laptop. That Omen was 4.7 pounds (2.13kg), versus 8.0 pounds (3.6kg) for the Predator. Sarah Tew/CNET This configuration is the high-end of the 15-inch Predator line, with an Intel Core i7-6700HQ CPU, 32GB of RAM, a big 512GB SSD coupled with a 1TB HDD and the Nvidia 980M GPU, for a total of £2,499 in the US. Cutting the SSD to 256GB and the RAM to 16GB gets you down to a more reasonable £1,999, while keeping the high-end CPU/GPU combo. About the least you can spend on a mainstream gaming laptop with an Nvida 980M card today is about £1,700, which can snag a slightly older 17-inch Asus G751 5 . Different configurations are available in the UK and Australia, topping out in the UK at 1,499 for the same CPU/GPU combo, but with only 16GB of RAM and a 128GB SSD, while configurations in Australia start at £AU2,999. References ^ Razer Blade (www.cnet.com) ^ laptops (www.cnet.com) ^ conjoined snakes (mythicscribes.com) ^ HP Omen (www.cnet.com) ^ Asus G751 (www.cnet.com)
  • A Guide to Computer Ports and Adapters Also Known As: Thunderbolt Description: The fastest common connection on the market today, Thunderbolt 3 can transfer data at up to 40 Gbps, four times faster than the fastest USB connection (USB 3.1 gen 2). This high-speed standard can also output to up to two 4K monitors at once, because a single port carries dual DisplayPort signals. On several new devices you can use Thunderbolt 3 to connect to an external graphics card, which allows you to play high-end games on an otherwise slim laptop. All Thunderbolt 3 ports use USB Type-C connections and double as USB Type-C ports, allowing them to connect to an entire universe of USB peripherals and, in most cases, to charge a laptop or tablet. Before Thunderbolt 3, which started appearing in laptops at the end of 2015, there was a Thunderbolt 2 and original Thunderbolt standard, but very few systems used them. With an adapter cable, you can connect your Thunderbolt 3 computer to older Thunderbolt devices. Adapters Needed: You can get a Thunderbolt 3 cable 1 for under £25, but be sure to read the specs before you buy; not all Thunderbolt cables can handle the full 40 Gbps, with some topping out at 20 Gbps. Thunderbolt 3 docking stations, which let you plug into a variety of monitors and peripherals, go for around £200. You can also use any USB Type-C cable, dock or device with a Thunderbolt 3 port. A Thunderbolt 3-to-Thunderbolt adapter for attaching to legacy Thunderbolt devices is pricey, going for over £100. MORE: Thunderbolt 3 Explained: Why You Need the World's Fastest Port 2 References ^ Thunderbolt 3 cable (www.amazon.com) ^ Thunderbolt 3 Explained: Why You Need the World's Fastest Port (www.laptopmag.com)
  • A revived Vaio packs plenty of power into a thin hybrid You had to hand it to Sony: the company's laptops were always unique. Sometimes inventive, often stylish, always different from the competition. They usually cost more, too, which could be why they didn't rack up many sales. The new Vaio Z Flip, an ultrathin 13-inch laptop, is Sony on steroids. OK, technically it's not Sony, because Sony sold the Vaio computer brand 1 to a new Japanese company back in 2014. But the new Vaio Z is more inventive -- and expensive -- than ever before. At a time when you can buy a high-quality laptop for under a thousand bucks 2 , the Vaio Z starts at £1,799. That means it's competing with the MacBook Pro and Surface Book , two of the very best laptops we've tried 3 . Why would anyone pick the Vaio over those machines? It's simple, really: Vaio fits the performance and features of that MacBook Pro into the svelte dimensions of a MacBook Air . Vaio Z vs. the competition Vaio Z Flip Lenovo Yoga 900 13-inch MacBook Pro Microsoft Surface Book Starting price (USD) £1,799 £1,199 £1,299 £1,499 Display 13.3-inch 2,560x1,440-pixel resolution 13.3-inch 3,200x1,800-pixel resolution 13.3-inch 2,560x1,600-pixel resolution 13.5-inch 3,000x2,000-pixel resolution Pixel density 220 276 227 267 Dimensions (imperial) 12.76 x 8.48 x 0.66 inches 12.75 x 8.86 x 0.59 inches 12.35 x 8.62 x 0.71 inches 12.3 x 8.67 x 0.9 inches Dimensions (metric) 324 x 215 x 16.8mm 324 x 225 x 14.9mm 314 x 219 x 18mm 220 x 312 x 22.8mm Weight 2.96lbs (1.34kg) 2.84lbs (1.29kg) 3.48lbs (1.58kg) 3.48lbs (1.58kg) Operating system Windows 10 Pro Windows 10 Pro OS X El Capitan Windows 10 Pro Processors Up to 6th-gen 3.3GHz 2-core Intel Core i7 Up to 6th-gen 2.5GHz 2-core Intel Core i7 Up to 5th-gen 3.1GHz 2-core Intel Core i7 Up to 6th-gen 2.6GHz 2-core Intel Core i7 Graphics Intel Iris 550 Intel HD 520 Intel Iris 6100 Intel HD 520 or Nvidia GeForce Storage 256GB / 512GB 256GB / 512GB 128GB / 256GB / 512GB 128GB / 256GB / 512GB / 1TB RAM 8GB / 16GB 8GB / 16GB 8GB / 16GB 8GB / 16GB Touchscreen Yes Yes No Yes Stylus Included No No Included Despite being marginally thinner and a half-pound lighter than Apple's 13-inch MacBook Pro 4 , the Vaio Z Flip has the same class of silicon under the hood: up to a 28-watt, 3.3GHz Intel Core i7 chip with Intel's latest Iris 550 graphics inside. The Vaio Z Flip offers enough oomph to play slightly older games such as 2013's Tomb Raider at 1080p resolution, as long as the graphics are set to medium levels of detail. Unlike most thin and light laptops 5 these days, the new Vaio doesn't look like it's directly aping the design of the MacBook Air . Yet it feels competitive with that popular system 6 , with a dark anodized aluminum lid and a matte-finish carbon-fiber base that insulates your legs from excessive heat. The aluminum deck extends around the edge of the laptop, making it feel thinner and making it harder to accidentally press the power button. View full gallery The Vaio Z Flip. John Kim/CNET Like any recent high-end laptop, the Flip has a fantastic screen. It's a 2,560x1,440-pixel resolution In-Plane Switching (IPS) panel that's easy to read at most any angle, and doubles as a responsive touchscreen. Pictures, websites and games look great since the screen can display 100 percent of the SRGB color spectrum, delivering pure and vibrant color. Plus, it has a trick up its sleeve, one learned from the original Sony Vaio Flip in 2013 7 : flip a switch to unlock a hidden hinge, set horizontally in the center of the display, which lets the screen fold down into a tablet 8 configuration. Sadly, the gap between the screen and chassis still makes it a little awkward to hold as a tablet, as it doesn't fold down completely flat, and the glossy glass screen is extremely reflective. Connections include two full-size USB 3.0 ports, an HDMI port and an SD card slot that lets you push the card all the way in so it fits nearly flush with the body (that's rare in computers this thin, but makes it easy to expand the on-board storage). No dongles should be necessary, though one does come in the box: a VGA adapter so you can connect to those old projectors 9 at work. Not only is the Vaio's power adapter tiny, but the plug is smartly designed, too: it'll pop right out of the socket if you trip over it, instead of yanking your laptop to the floor. References ^ sold the Vaio computer brand (www.cnet.com) ^ under a thousand bucks (www.cnet.com) ^ the very best laptops we've tried (www.cnet.com) ^ Apple's 13-inch MacBook Pro (www.cnet.com) ^ laptops (www.cnet.com) ^ that popular system (www.cnet.com) ^ from the original Sony Vaio Flip in 2013 (www.cnet.com) ^ tablet (www.cnet.com) ^ projectors (www.cnet.com)
  • A sleek laptop that leaves you wanting more Last year, something wonderful happened in the world of Windows laptops. Quality became affordable. Companies like Dell, HP and Asus started selling sleek notebooks made of strong aluminum and carbon fiber for less than £1,000. View full gallery The new HP Envy 13. Josh Miller/CNET The HP Envy 13 is the latest of those computers to enter the ring. It starts at just £800 ( 699) for a no-compromise configuration that comes with a 2.3GHz 15-watt Intel Core i5 processor, 8GB of memory, 128GB of speedy solid-state storage, and a crisp 1080p screen -- all in a chassis that weighs just 2.8 pounds and measures 12.9mm thick. It's one of the thinnest laptops 1 ever made. Thin laptops compared HP Envy 13 MacBook Air (13-inch) Asus Zenbook UX305 Lenovo Yoga 900 Dell XPS 13 Vaio Z Flip Dimensions 12.85 x 8.9 in. (326 x 226mm) 12.8 x 8.94 in. (325 x 227mm) 12.76 x 8.9 in. (324 x 226mm) 12.75 x 8.86 in. (324 x 225mm) 11.98 x 7.88 in. (304 x 200mm) 12.76 x 8.48 in. (324 x 215mm) Thickness 0.51 inch (12.95mm) 0.68 inch (17mm) 0.48 inch (12.3mm) 0.59 inch (14.9mm) 0.6 inch (15.2mm) 0.66 inch (16.8mm) Weight 2.81 lbs. (1275g) 2.96 lbs. (1350g) 2.65 lbs. (1202g) 2.84 lbs. (1288g) 2.7 lbs. (1224g) 2.96 lbs. (1343g) Processor 6th-gen 15W Intel "Skylake" 5th-gen 15W Intel "Broadwell" 2nd-gen 4.5W Intel Core M 6th-gen 15W Intel "Skylake" 6th-gen 15W Intel "Skylake" 6th-gen 28W Intel "Skylake" But after spending a week with the HP Envy 13, I can't quite recommend it. It's just not as good as the competition. (Skip to the conclusion to find out what to buy instead.) There's no one giant glaring deal-breaker that ruins the Envy 13. In fact, there's a lot to love. My favorite feature: a fingerprint sensor that lets me swipe my way into Windows instead of typing a password. It's one of the most responsive I've used on a consumer PC. View full gallery Josh Miller/CNET Not that typing passwords would be much of a chore. I've been banging out every word of this review on the Envy 13's well-spaced backlit keyboard, and I've had no trouble yet. Same goes for the glass touchpad: Even though the extra-wide mousing surface means the base of my thumb hits it every so often, the mouse cursor doesn't jump around like it has with cut-rate laptops. (Two-finger scrolling is a smidge jerkier than with the best touchpads I've used, but it's definitely passable here.) While typing, I'm marveling at how good Pandora Radio can sound on the Envy 13's Bang & Olufsen-branded speakers. Some tunes can sound pretty tinny, but it's remarkable how wide a sonic field these speakers are able to project. I can clearly hear the distinctions between the instruments, and/or feel dubstep beats exploding all around my head. View full gallery Insert your favorite "Envy" joke here. Josh Miller/CNET Though the Envy's design definitely resembles a certain Apple laptop, there are enough differences here that the similarities aren't too embarrassing. The lid's dark black bezel does a great job of highlighting the screen, which has a matte finish that doesn't produce the distracting reflections we typically see with glass. It's also pretty neat how the J-shaped lid lifts the laptop up to a comfortable typing angle. The Envy 13's performance is what we expect from one of Intel's latest 15-watt Core i5 processors. It's nothing exceptional, but it's more than fast enough for everyday tasks -- unless you run into a weird issue I saw where the laptop can slow down while you charge it. (More on that later.) Even the port situation isn't as dire as you might expect on a laptop this thin. There's a full-size HDMI port, a full-size SD card reader that doesn't leave the card hanging out the side, and three full-size USB 3.0 ports as well as a standard 3.5mm headset jack. My only complaint is that the USB ports are extremely tight. When I try to yank out my thumbdrive, it feels like I'm going to break it. References ^ laptops (www.cnet.com)
  • A Tablet or Smartphone Could Power Your Next Laptop When you get a load of the new NexDock, you may feel like it's 2011 all over again. Similar to the old Motorola Atrix 4G 1 , this new laptop uses a smartphone as its brain. The company is trying to get off the ground via an Indiegogo campaign. The NexDock 2 includes a 10,000-mAh battery, keyboard and a 14-inch, 1366 x 768-pixel display for £149 (though early backers can get it as low as £99 as of this writing), which is cheaper than most laptops. When you plug in a Windows 10 smartphone into its mini HDMI port, you can use Microsoft's Windows Continuum feature to use your tablet or phone as a full-fledged laptop. MORE: Smartphones with the Longest Battery Life 3 Continuum allows all Windows 10 devices, such as tablets and smartphones, to expand onto larger monitors. This Microsoft operating system feature allows Windows apps to resize gracefully, based on what the OS recognizes as the largest screen size available. Essentially it makes the monitor and phone or tablet into dual monitors, where screens and data can be moved back and forth. As PCWorld points out 4 , the choice of mini HDMI is curious when more and more phones use USB Type-C, which supports video output. NexDock has plans for future USB-C devices, but they aren't part of the current Indiegogo campaign. In addition to running off of Windows 10 smartphones and tablets, NexDock also claims their shell can connect to mini PCs, as well as Android and iOS devices. Of course, without Windows 10, you will only have one screen. The Motorola Atrix 4G combined a specific Android smartphone with an 11.6-inch dock for £299, so the NexDock has more versatility and value right out of the gate. As of this writing, the NexDock is at 10 percent of its goal, with one month left to go in its campaign. The Early Bird package is already sold out. The company claims supporters will receive their docks by June 2016. Will you be throwing your money in the ring? Recommended by Andrew E. Freedman, Andrew joined Laptopmag.com in 2015, reviewing computers and keeping up with the latest news. He holds a M.S. in Journalism (Digital Media) from Columbia University. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Kotaku, PCMag and Complex, among others. Follow him on Twitter @FreedmanAE. Andrew E. Freedman, on References ^ Motorola Atrix 4G (www.laptopmag.com) ^ NexDock (www.indiegogo.com) ^ Smartphones with the Longest Battery Life (www.tomsguide.com) ^ PCWorld points out (www.pcworld.com)
  • AC Adapter Power Charger Laptop Power Supply Cord For Lenovo IdeaPad Yoga 13 11 11s Thinkpad X1 Helix 11.6 M490s Edge E431 E531 S431 20AX0001US 45N0254 45N0256 45N0262 S3-S431 36200251 ADLX65NLC3A Ultrabook 20V 3.25A 65W-UK Power Cable Included - Cheap
  • AC Adapter/Power Supply & Cord for IBM Lenovo Thinkpad R60 R60e R61 R61e R61i R400 R500 ; Sl300 Sl400 Sl410 Sl500 Sl510 ; T61 T60p T61p ; N100 N200 ; T400 T400s T410 T410i T410s T500 T510 ; V100 V200 ; W500 ; X60 X60s X61 X61s X200 X201 X201s X300 X301 ; Y100 Y300 Y500 ; Z60 Z60m Z60t Z61 Z61e Z61p ; 1706 3000 6459 6460 7650 7658 7659 7675 7676 0761 0763 0764 ; 92p1107 92p1108 40y7659 92p1160 Pa-1900-o8i Pa-1900-o8 20V 4.5A 90W-7.9*5.5mm--UK Power Cable Included (For LENOVO 90W 7.9*5.5mm) - Bonus Price

ACER LAPTOPS APPLE LAPTOPS ASUS LAPTOPS COMPAQ LAPTOPS DELL LAPTOPS HP LAPTOPS LENOVO LAPTOPS MSI LAPTOPS SAMSUNG LAPTOPS SONY LAPTOPS TOSHIBA LAPTOPS